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Photography Question 
Josh 
 

crome


i am new to digital. I hear crome mentioned alot but what is it?


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6/30/2008 3:59:42 PM

 
Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/17/2005
  Greetings Josh. Either bumpers on your car (as in "chromium" an element I believe found commonly around the periodic table; the trim on your camera, or back in the old(er) days, transparency reversible film stock as in Kodachrome, Ektachrome, Fujichrome, etc. The usage as far as these things is concerned, film is concerned is spelled "chrome".

A "Crome" may also be an alien from another planet. ;>)
Take it light.
Mark


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6/30/2008 5:28:39 PM

 
Alan N. Marcus   Hi Josh,

Many digital editing software programs allow the user to alter the appearance of a picture. These alterations are called “effects”. CHROME is one such effect whereby the target picture is altered and takes on a shiny metallic look. Chrome is just one of many effects. Others are colored foil, hot wax, neon glow, enamel etc.

Alan Marcus


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6/30/2008 10:36:49 PM

 
W.   
'chrome' means 'color' in Greek. 'Polychrome' is therefore 'multi color', a.k.a. full color, while 'monochrome', duh, means 1 color, often mistaken for black and white. Black and white is of course NO color. Because neither black nor white are colors, of course.

Have fun!


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7/1/2008 12:12:05 AM

 
Alan N. Marcus   In nature, one is unlikely to find earth compounds that are brightly colored. In 1797 the French chemist Nicolas-Louis Vaugeelin isolated a silvery metal obtained from red, yellow and green earthy compounds. As a result he suggested a name for this new element “chromium”.

The word “chrome” was given to colored chromium compounds now used as pigments by the paint and dye industry.

A similar discovery was made five years latter, by the English chemist Smithson Tennant as he examined crude platinum. This new element was also found in differently colored compounds. Tennant named it “iridium” from the Greek word “iris” rainbow. Iris was a messenger god that traveled from heaven to earth on a rainbow bridge. The colored portion of our eye is called the iris.

In 1935, at Kodak’s research lab, L D Mannes and L Godowsksy, invented the first practical color film. They called it Kodachrome.

Alan Marcus (marginal technical gobbledygook)
ammarcus@earthlink.net


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7/1/2008 7:10:51 AM

 
Nobu Nagase
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/31/2003
 
Some (I don't know if all) Fuji FinePix P&S digital cameras have the color option called "Chrome" in addition to Standard Color and Black&White.

The chrome option is a quick way to boost contrast and saturation.
I used to shoot S7000 for a while, but did not explore much with this.


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7/1/2008 8:16:58 AM

 
Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/17/2005
  But wait....there's more !!! Isn't b&w also referred to as "monochrome" or "monochromatic" as in one, not multiple colors? BUT is black OR white a color or which one is it. (Now I'm confused). Probably gray? Or maybe that's "Lighter Shade of Pale".

My next question is: "Why is the sea so salty"? Anyone...
Be well guys.
Mark


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7/1/2008 9:25:42 AM

 
Alan N. Marcus   Photographic films, both color and black & white are dependent upon three salts of silver. All modern films are comprised of just one or a blend of all three. In order of their sensitivity, silver bromine, silver chloride, silver iodine. All are naturally sensitive only to blue light. Thus early films rendered reds and greens as black on the finished print. These films were commonly called “blind” because they were “color blind.

In 1873 H Vogel discovered he could add colored dye to a batch of silver salts and then coat the dyed crystals on glass plates. The dyed film he made was black & white however the film he made was now sensitive to both blue and green light. This was a major benchmark in the history of photography.

In 1904 E Konig and B Homolka experimented with different sensitizing dyes. Now black & white films gained sensitivity to all three primary colors of light i.e. red – green – blue.

Technically, B & W films sensitive to blue and green were called call orthochromatic and B & W. films sensitive to red – green – blue light were called panchromatic. However, in common usage, of this period, these films were termed “chrome” films.

Alan Marcus (marginal technical gobbledygook)
ammarcus@earthlink.net


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7/1/2008 10:16:17 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  If white is not a color, then there is no yellow. Only red and green coming together.
The ink is black, the page is white.


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7/1/2008 4:12:11 PM

 
Alan N. Marcus   The additive colors red – green - blue
Green is the presence of green light hence blue and red are absent
Red is the presence of red light hence green and blue are absent
Blue is the presence of blue light hence green and red are absent

The subtractive colors cyan – magenta - yellow
Red + green yields yellow hence the absents of blue
Red + blue yields magenta hence the absents of green
Red + green yields cyan hence blue is absent

Black & white unbiased i.e. neutral
Black is the absents light
White is the presence of red + green + blue in equal amounts

Alan Marcus (marginal technical gobbledygook)
ammarcus@earthlink.net


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7/1/2008 4:51:15 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  He answers questions that haven't even been asked.


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7/1/2008 5:11:45 PM

 
Alan N. Marcus   A typo in my explanation of the subtractive colors.

Below is corrected copy:

The subtractive colors cyan – magenta - yellow
Red + green yields yellow hence the absence of blue
Red + blue yields magenta hence the absence of green
Green + blue yields cyan hence the absence of red

I answer questions that have not been asked because photography is based on a pedestal of understanding light and color and how the human eye/brain interacts with these radiant energies.

As with any science there is confusion, so when I am confronted by nonsense like “If white is not a color, there is no yellow” I feel compelled to explain.

Alan Marcus (marginal technical gobbledygook)
ammarcus@earthlink.net


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7/1/2008 5:57:46 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  And when you over explain things, especially when you're trying to explain a comment made as an obvious joke, you make yourself look like a mad scientist, instead of a scientist.
Like always turning a yes or no question into a four paragraph short story.


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7/2/2008 10:39:59 AM

 
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