BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
William Sherman
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/5/2007
 

Dull Photos -- Brownish Tint


I use a Canon 30D with Canon lenses (EF 100x400mm with stabilizer and EF 17x85mm with stabilizer)and shoot mostly outside nature shots in JPEG. No matter what the weather conditions, sunny or cloudy, my photos come out of the camera with a dullish tone, kind of like a brownish tint. I can fix this problem with my post processing software, but I would like to know if anyone has a suggestion for changing some camera settings so that the photos are crystal clear and bright right out of the camera. Thanks.


To love this question, log in above
1/31/2008 9:37:59 AM

 
W.   
Hi William,

I suggest you start by showing us your problem: post 1 or 2 pix with that "dullish, brownish tint".

A picture paints 1,000 words.

Have fun!


To love this comment, log in above
1/31/2008 9:42:23 AM

 
William Sherman
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/5/2007
 
 
 
OK. I have attached four photos of some shots I took recently at a local graveyard. The photos were taken around 10 a.m., the sky was blue with white clouds and there was snow on the ground. The before photos are directly from the camera and you can see how dull they are. The after photos are post processing using Arcsoft PhotoStudio simple enhance option. The colors on the after photos are much closer to reality. I would like to know if there are camera settings on the 30D that would get rid of the dull photos. Thanks.


To love this comment, log in above
1/31/2008 9:54:55 AM

 
W.   
Thanks for posting them.
Looking at the before & after versions side-by-side on-screen I'd say there is something wrong with your White Balance setting, or maybe your cam is set to apply a warm filter.
I would (re)check those settings.

Good luck!


To love this comment, log in above
1/31/2008 10:09:18 AM

 
William Sherman
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/5/2007
  I use the Auto White Balance option for all my shots. Is there something that needs to be changed for AWB to get a correct and clear exposure? Also, I checked my 30D camera menu and my Magic Lantern manual for information about internal filters. There is no mention of that, just external filters. Where would I find an internal filter setting?

Bill


To love this comment, log in above
1/31/2008 10:27:09 AM

 
W.   
Go out and do test exposures, Bill. Use the AWB, the sunny daylight and the cloudy daylight White Balance settings. Put the pictures up on your screen, side-by-side, and see which you like best. That's the WB setting you need for that snowscape (as well as approximately 1 stop overexposure to compensate for the snow).


To love this comment, log in above
1/31/2008 11:11:24 AM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  Hi William; perhaps because this is an issue I am dealing with right now, I think that part of your problem may be the fact that you are shooting in bright light with snow. Bright blue skies and snow on the ground can really fool your exposure meter. Also, since you are using auto white balance this may contribute to your problem. Every light meter the one built into your camera and those that are hand held read light as shades of gray. When you have a mid-tone subject, such as the monuments and gravestones, surrounded by a light subject the snow in your case the meter will generally underexpose the image thus giving you the unwanted gray/brown overtones. This is particularly an issue when the sky is bright, again as seen in your images; so that the light falling on the snow is overly bright or overly contrasty (meaning it is bright and also shadowy as seen in your image). The way to deal with this problem is to first take your meter readings from the main subject rather than the ground or the sky use spot metering. Also use this same subject as the guide for setting white balance. Then compensate for the light by increasing your exposure by anything from 1/3 to a full stop depending upon the degree of light. In cases where the light is very bright you may have to increase exposure by even a greater degree. Experiment with various settings checking the histogram and making adjustments as needed until you are happy with the results. I hope that this helps.

Irene


To love this comment, log in above
1/31/2008 2:34:10 PM

 
Log in to respond or ask your own question.