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Photography Question 
Denise McNickle
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2007
 

What resolution to you use?


When you post photographs to your gallery, what resolution do you use?
Do you take it down to 72ppi? I am trying to figure out what resolution to use. I want the photographs to look good but also want to prevent someone from taking them from my gallery and using them.

Thanks for the help.

Denise


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1/5/2008 5:09:07 PM

 
Richard Lynch
BetterPhoto Member
PhotoshopCS.com
Richard's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: Correcting and Enhancing Images
4-Week Short Course: Looking Good in Print and On the Web: Color Management
  The process of uploading will leave your images small enough so that they are not good for much more than a wallet shot. The official guidelines are these:

  • Saved as a JPEG, TIFF, BMP, or PING file type.
  • Sized to no more than 500 pixels on the short dimension. For example:
    1. 500 (w) x 750 (h) for a vertical image.
    2. 750 x 500 for a horizontal image.
    3. 500 x 1250 or so for a vertical panoramic image.

  • Preferably 72 pixels per inch.
  • Less than 2.5 MB. Files larger than 2.5 MB are not accepted.

Resizing before upload may give you more control over the result.

Richard Lynch


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1/6/2008 6:30:14 AM

 
Beau Hudspeth Photography
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/22/2004
  The reality is this: if you follow the official guidelines above, your images will end up being down-sampled some.

In order to not have this happen, you want to keep the shorter side of your image at 480 or less. My standard for uploading is a 480x720 @72dpi sRGB file in .TIF format.

I have also noticed that you want to oversaturate your image ever so slightly since some of the saturation gets lost in the conversion to .JPG.

Good luck!


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1/25/2008 2:48:02 AM

 
Richard Lynch
BetterPhoto Member
PhotoshopCS.com
Richard's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: Correcting and Enhancing Images
4-Week Short Course: Looking Good in Print and On the Web: Color Management
  Beau,
Better not to force the conversion and convert to a color space that fits the web. sRGB will be best and most compatible with the upload. I would save to JPEG rather than TIF using the highest quality compression as I believe the setting is adopted by the uploader and you risk it choosing the default which may be lower.

It is likley the format you choose that is 'enhancing' the conversion.

Richard Lynch


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1/25/2008 4:51:16 AM

 
Beau Hudspeth Photography
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/22/2004
  That is an interesting thought, Richard, and I would tend to agree with you except on one point: When I have spoken to 3 separate support reps at BF, I was told each time to do what I suggested above to get the best results.

It looks like there is some confusion in the ranks. :)

Thanx again!


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1/25/2008 9:53:35 AM

 
Richard Lynch
BetterPhoto Member
PhotoshopCS.com
Richard's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: Correcting and Enhancing Images
4-Week Short Course: Looking Good in Print and On the Web: Color Management
  My main point was that you should not be getting desaturation -- which is often a byproduct of stuffing a broader color space into a more compressed space. I didn't see your earlier reference to sRGB and thought you might be uploading AdobeRGB images. I see now that is not the case. However, I upload sRGB JPEG files all the time with no desaturation. My understanding from tech support is that you can use TIFF, JPEG, BMP and PNG, and I've no recollection of them suggesting specifically to instructors to use TIFF. As the file ends as a JPEG, technically it shouldn't matter (except for the quality issue I mention).

They may have changed the uploader, but I'll have to put in a call myself to be sure we're reading the same reults...

Richard


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1/25/2008 11:06:39 AM

 
Corinne M. Thompson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/31/2005
Contact Corinne
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  Just bookmarking the thread!


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1/26/2008 5:48:37 AM

 
Corinne M. Thompson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/31/2005
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  Richard,
Was wondering if you ever got a response on this:

"They may have changed the uploader, but I'll have to put in a call myself to be sure we're reading the same reults..."


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2/19/2008 3:53:06 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Work on them as a tiff. But save some time uploading and do it as a jpeg.
Resolution won't matter either because they're displayed at 72. So might as well keep it at that.
And make it 480.


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2/19/2008 8:58:05 PM

 
Sarah G   Can't prevent them from being taken from your gallery. Put them up and they are fair game no matter what you do.


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2/19/2008 10:12:08 PM

 
Richard Lynch
BetterPhoto Member
PhotoshopCS.com
Richard's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: Correcting and Enhancing Images
4-Week Short Course: Looking Good in Print and On the Web: Color Management
  Sarah, I'm not sure that is quite right. Of course people can take screen shots, clear off copyright, and even remove watermarking with effort, but it is first illegal to remove copyright information, second, illegal to use copyrighted images without the permission of those holding the copyright, and third really unlikely that you'll get any great result beyond about 3.5 inches in print. Published materials of any sort really are technically not "fair game", and it may be remiss to refer to them that way.

Corinne, there was a change in the uploader at some point, but specifically what that was and when precisely over the past 6 months it occurred I am not sure. There is no recommendation that I am aware of in talking with staff that TIFF be used above anything else. TIFF, JPEG, BMP and PNG are all viable formats, and again I suggest JPEG because I believe you can affect the compression by your settings, and the files saved will have been stripped of extraneous materials (additional layers, channels, paths, converted to 8-bit, etc.) as JPEG is made to be a lean file type and these will likely upload faster and with less grief. That is not an official word, it is mine.

Hope that helps!

Richard Lynch


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2/20/2008 4:24:06 AM

 
Corinne M. Thompson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/31/2005
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  Thank you Richard, I appreciate you taking the time to respond!


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2/20/2008 7:23:46 AM

 
David A. Bliss   dpi is irrelevant when it comes to resizing the picture for web display. All that matters are actual pixels. If you resize a picture (using resample) to 750 on it's widest side, that is all the pixels there are... 750 on it's widest side. dpi has nothing to do with display, it is for printing.

You can test this. Resize a picture to 750 on it's widest size with a dpi of 1. Save it with a unique name. Resize the same picture with a dpi of 1000. Save it with a unique name. Now look at both of them in IE. They will look exactly the same.


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2/20/2008 9:04:57 AM

 
Ted L. Craig
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/21/2007
  Question follow-up to uploading images to BP: When taking a full resolution jpg to a 72 dpi with 500 on the short size - I believe the resulting image is not as good as the full shot. I read in a book by Scott Kelby that a reduction to the dimensions just described can leave a picture with need of sharpening. I wonder if there is a full-proof formula for placing a reduced full resolution picture on the BP site with no deterioation of picture quality and yet keeping the picture size within BP's wishes? I realize this question is considerably after the thread ran out.


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12/10/2008 2:15:52 PM

 
Ken Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/11/2005
Contact Ken
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  Ted, there's been a lot of discussion over the past year, on the BP size thing. Now, they resize to 800 on the max...meaning, if you upload at 1200 width, they'll take it down to 800. It used to be min of 500, and you could have a huge pano out to 3000 pixels. Not anymore. There's probably no right/wrong answer, but before I submit to BP, I already have it resized to 800 on the long side, sharpen, and save to TIF.


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12/10/2008 2:32:08 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
  "Can't prevent them from being taken from your gallery. Put them up and they are fair game no matter what you do."

I wish someone would steal my images! LOL That's what attorneys are for. A little xtra cash never hurts. ;)

Seriously Sarah, as Richard said, it's pretty difficult to get a decent print from what is uploaded here. If someone wants one of my images for personal enjoyment, I really don't care.

Now if I see it in a commercial publication, that is a whole new story.

Pete


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12/10/2008 2:53:31 PM

 
Richard Lynch
BetterPhoto Member
PhotoshopCS.com
Richard's Photo Courses:
4-Week Short Course: Correcting and Enhancing Images
4-Week Short Course: Looking Good in Print and On the Web: Color Management
  Ted asked: "I wonder if there is a fool-proof formula for placing a reduced full resolution picture on the BP site with no deterioration of picture quality and yet keeping the picture size within BP's wishes?"

There would not be, no. When you reduce the size of an image the image does through a process of resampling and decimation, which is as it sounds: image information is effectively destroyed to resize the image. You can use some sharpening to try to crisp up the edges and enhance the appearance of sharpness, but the details will be compromised to some degree. The amount of sharpening, and even the type of sharpening and how it is applied can be optimized for the content of the image, so there is no one setting that will work for all images (or all tastes).

I hope that helps.

Not all too long ago there was a discussion about resizing and resampling types in another thread here:
Resampling Type Discussion. You may get some additional info from that.

Richard Lynch


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12/10/2008 3:48:38 PM

 
Ted L. Craig
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/21/2007
  Thank you for your responses. I have been a member for a couple of years and only in the recent months have I noticed the downgrade of quality in the process. It just shows you I am challenged by my eyesight. But apparently I will have to work on that. Thanks again.


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12/11/2008 5:24:40 AM

 
Marianne Fortin
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/23/2006
  I remember the same discussions as Ken and agree with him that the best upload size is 800 on the long side.

It used to be 480 on the short side but that was when BP was applying borders. When they stopped doing that images didn't look right at the old size.

Basically your image posted to BP should have the same physical dimensions as your image viewed in your editing program (at 100%). If it doesn't then the upload process is resizing your image.

The easiest way I have found to check this is to have the original image in your editor and measure it with a ruler, then measure the same image after uploading to BP.

If your image is 800 on the long side then it should measure 23.5 cm on your monitor both on BP and in your editing program.

You can experiment with different sizes (500, 750, 480, 720) and then upload them to BP and measure against your original for that size.

I think I've just confused myself!


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12/11/2008 11:02:03 AM

 
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