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Category: New Questions

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Photography Question 
kelly a. jones
kellyjonesphotography.com

member since: 10/2/2007
 

Program for Black and White Photos


What photo software do you recommend that will produce the softer black and white pictures and the black and white pictures that have some color?

11/5/2007 4:42:29 PM

 
W. 

member since: 9/25/2006
 
Hi Kelly,

take your pick from a rich list:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_raster_graphics_editors

Practically all can make your pix B/W, in the gradations of your choice, and many of the better specced ones can bring partial color back into the image.

11/5/2007 7:35:46 PM

 
Carlton Ward
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Carlton
Carlton's Gallery
carltonwardphoto.com

member since: 12/13/2005
  Hello Kelly, I use Adobe Photoshop CS3. It does just about everything and, though a bit pricey, it processes Raw images much better than CS2, and the new Bridge is really useful for many of your photo management needs. You have the ability to change any photo to B&W and use layers with lots of filters to make images do just about anything.
There is a technique called Orton and if you combine that with a black & white image, you can get a really soft photo. The opacity controls used with various layer effects give you so many options. You can use saturation to make your images appear more black & white and adjust to have just a little color, but though this may be the easiest way, it is not the best to achieve the desired effect.
If you are serious about photo editing, Photoshop is the choice for most photographers. There is other photo editing software out there, and many are cheaper if you have a limited budget. I recently bought Corel Painter X but this is more for turning my photos into paintings, which you can also do with Photoshop but with limited brushes and canvas options. If you look at the classes offered here at BetterPhoto, you will find classes in Photoshop and Adobe Elements.

11/5/2007 8:28:36 PM

 
Christopher A. Walrath
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/25/2006
  This should be posted on a digital thread. Not a film one.

11/11/2007 8:47:03 AM

 
A C
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 12/6/2004
  strange ... but it was posted in the digital thread. It is actually in both threads.

11/11/2007 10:10:01 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member
gregorylagrange.org

member since: 11/11/2003
  Film police

11/11/2007 4:08:39 PM

 
Steven A. Serpa
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/22/2006
  Could you explain the technique called:
Orton used with Black and White?

11/13/2007 3:50:19 AM

 
Carlton Ward
BetterPhoto Member
Contact Carlton
Carlton's Gallery
carltonwardphoto.com

member since: 12/13/2005
 
 
  Orton Black & White
Orton Black & White
© Carlton Ward
carltonwardphoto.com
Canon EOS 20D Digi...
 
 
Digital Technique

Here, there are many ways to simulate an Orton slide sandwich. You can do it the same way as outlined above for slides overexposing two separate images and then in the computer stacking the images together in software and blending them. Personally, I prefer to take my existing digitized photos (either from film scans or digital camera files) and running them through the process below to see if they work as “Orton Images”.

Here is the step-by-step recipe for making Orton images in Photoshop:

1. Open any image you wish to try the technique on. Make a duplicate of the image (Image>Duplicate). Close the original image.
2. Lighten the image as follows: Image>Apply Image… then in the dialog box that comes up change the bending mode to “Screen” and the Opacity to 100%. This will give you an appropriately overexposed image.
3. Duplicate this overexposed image (Image>Duplicate).
4. Blur this second image (Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur… and in the dialog box use a Radius setting of 15 to 50 pixels – the higher the pixel setting the blurrier the photo and the more ‘painterly’ the image… but you can go too far!). Experiment with different settings, for my tastes and for the size of my digital files (50-100 megabytes) a radius of about 25 pixels works perfect.
5. Now select the move tool from the Photoshop tool bar (or just press “v” on your keyboard for quicker access to the move tool). Hold down the “shift” key and use your mouse to drag and drop the blurry image onto the sharp one (don’t let go of the shift key until after you release the mouse button or the images won’t be in perfect alignment).
6. Bring up the layers palette in Photoshop (F7 is the keyboard shortcut). Under the word “Layers” in the layers palette will be a menu box of blending modes. Change the blending mode from “normal” to “multiply”.
7. Now “flatten’ the two layers by pressing “CTRL+E” or by clicking on the sideways triangle in the layers palette to select ‘flatten image’.

There, you now have an Orton image - if you like your new masterpiece save the file!

11/13/2007 10:46:17 AM

 
Steven A. Serpa
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 7/22/2006
  Wow Carlton,
Orton,
what a great recipe this is going right into my Photoshop CS3 cookbook.

Your Black and White is fantasic I just think B&W has real Class.

Thank you,
Steve

11/13/2007 2:10:07 PM

 
Christopher A. Walrath
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 4/25/2006
  Someone call a bobby? Wee ooo Wee ooo Wee ooo NEAH NEAH NEAH NEAH NEAH.

11/13/2007 5:55:43 PM

 

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