BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Jess Miss Chant
 

Grainy Photos


Hi, Just wondering if anyone could give me any suggestions to a problem i'm having with my images? They keep coming out grainy!
I've really only just started with photography so as you can probably tell I don't know alot yet.
I use a Nikon F65 Film camera.
Close up pics tend be of slightly better quality but anything else I shoot is just apperaing grainy (most annoying). If anyone could help, it'd be much appreciated.


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9/18/2007 10:11:58 AM

 
Todd Bennett
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/8/2004
  Jess,

What type and speed of film are you using?


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9/18/2007 11:15:45 AM

 
Ariel Lepor
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/8/2005
  I wrote up something about image settings and how they effect the pictures, and it talks a little about grain, too. http://scrattyphotography.wordpress.com/camera-settings/

Basically, if you shoot really long time exposures or (more commonly) if you use a high ISO film, you will notice grain.

An example picture could help, but...

If you're taking a picture indoors with no flash and with 1/30s shutter and a f/2.8 aperture (or something, you will probably need an iso if 500 to get proper exposure, since it isn't so bright. High iso means high grain.

If you are outside on a sunny day and do something like a 1/1000s shutter and f/11 aperture, your iso is still going to need to be high (like 400). But you can use lower iso film (such as 100), you can still get a 1/1000 shutter if you make the aperture wider (to f/5.6).

In whatever situation, if you use a high ISO you will probably get grain, but you can use lower iso if you use slower shutter or wider aperture.

Close-up shots might use a wider aperture for a blurred background, reducing the need for a high iso, or perhaps making the shutter faster, which could also reduce that type of noise. Or, maybe since everything looks big in a close-up, you're not looking at the picture the same way as you would a non-close-up.


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9/18/2007 11:24:42 AM

 
Jess Miss Chant   I am using Kodak Gold 200


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9/18/2007 12:44:13 PM

 
Ariel Lepor
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/8/2005
  Get slower film: ISO 50 to 100


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9/18/2007 1:26:21 PM

 
Todd Bennett
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/8/2004
  Jess,

If we had an image to look at we might be better able to help. At this point we are simply guessing as to what the problem is. I wouldn't think that a 200 speed film wood bring in so much grain that it would be objectionable.


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9/18/2007 1:34:23 PM

 
Jess Miss Chant   ok, thanks for the advice!


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9/18/2007 1:34:31 PM

 
Todd Bennett
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/8/2004
  I should have said "I wouldn't think that a 200 speed film would bring in so much grain that it would be objectionable. Sorry for the typo.


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9/18/2007 2:00:21 PM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  well slick,welcome.
they ain't grainy.too much caffeine.slow shutter speed,slow lens,low light?
on a lighter note i'm thinking a 3 wood.film at eleven..
I may sign this later,back to you jess.


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9/19/2007 9:02:38 PM

 
Jess Miss Chant   Hi again.

I think I may have sussed out why this is happening? I did warn you I am a complete novice!!! so please don't laugh.

I think it may be to do with my aperature settings??

I have only recently bought this camera and being all excited have rushed out to use it without checking the settings.

I will study my manual properly (like I should have in the first place) and have a fiddle about and see if the problem improves. Thankyou all for your help though.

Jess


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9/20/2007 6:07:37 AM

 
Andy 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/28/2002
  Hi Jess, welcome to BP.

Since you did not show us a picture or tell us the situation when you took the picture, we can only guess what had happened. It sounds like the picture was underexposed (not enough light - for example, indoor or at night) and the lab was trying to salvage the picture for you by over process it (like brightened the picture too much). One way to be sure is to look at the negatives and compare the problem negative with a well exposed negative. You can really see the difference.

Ariel mentioned using slower film. But that is a different kind of grain. The higher of sensitive, the more grain of the film (of course there are exceptionals like the pro films) even if it is well exposed. That's the characteristic of the film. The grain you saw was due to the negatives being underexposed and the lab over corrected it. Using slower film only makes it worse because you need to expose the film longer.

However, Ariel's article provides basic knowledge about the camera. If you have more question, just ask or google. Hope this helps.


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9/20/2007 6:25:16 AM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  nobody's laughing jess.
200 speed film does not produce grain.go with 50?400 speed film doesn't produce grain.
since you don't want to include more info,as everyone has asked,what's up?
your photos could be very dark or very bright,even blurry.
do we assume you as a newbie are shooting manual?what was your aperture setting?
ya can't lead us down that road that I did this,and it didn't work.
i'll apologize later,but I still ain't sighning.


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9/20/2007 8:20:32 PM

 
Ariel Lepor
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/8/2005
  Yeah Jess. You're not going to get a proper answer if you don't give us enough info.

So, is there any processing being done on the photos?

Are they being properly exposed?

Could you upload a photo?

Please say exactly the situation the picture is being taken and any settings relating to it.


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9/20/2007 9:17:38 PM

 
Jess Miss Chant   Blimey! Chill out people! Sorry I don't reply straight away.
I cant upload a picture as I do not have a scanner.
Have looked at negatives and there is differences in some of them. The more grainer pics have brighter exposures. My pics aren't just grainy, slightly dark and blurry too. Not sharpe at all.
Hope that answers your questions.
Thanks


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9/21/2007 6:22:23 AM

 
Ariel Lepor
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/8/2005
  Oh.

Well, I'm not sure what the problem is. Maybe it has to do with the lens. What are the lighting conditions and situations you take the pictures in?, that might help.


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9/21/2007 10:57:56 AM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  ok jess, let me take in the slight misspelling,vagueness of the question,and being a bit offish,blimey.
i'll ignore the fact I think I know you and realize,your handholding?no answer..
low light,no info..
conditions,no answer..
your a newbie and your looking at your negatives?which kinda means you know what to look for?
you answer one honest question,i'll give an honest answer.
400 speed film pics will give a disheveld look at certain slow shutter speeds due to mirror slap,,,,,,but.
go get your nagatives printed on a cd,then you won't have an excuse.
I really don't mind seeming like a harsh school marm ,or a fool,when a smell is in the air.
film at 11:05.
back to you jess.


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9/21/2007 7:02:59 PM

 
Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/14/2005
  Sam, I'm leaning towards agreeing with you on this one. Do people still say Blimey?

But for what it's worth . . .

Your camera has an Auto setting - until you figure out how the rest of it works, use Auto. If you are indoors, use the flash. Read the manual.

If you are using Kodak Gold 200, and are within 2 or 3 stops of the correct exposure, it's unlikely that you will have grainy pictures. The dark, grainy pictures have light negatives because they are very underexposed.

Cheers.


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9/21/2007 7:40:48 PM

 
Bernard    I agree with everything Sam says, he keeps me laughing for hours on end


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9/22/2007 1:01:12 AM

 
Jess Miss Chant   Sam...What do u mean, u think you know me?
The photos that are grainy etc have been taken in various conditions, inside, outside, sunny, cloudy. Most of the photos I have taken are with me using the auto function but some are taken in manual aswell.


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9/22/2007 7:12:53 AM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  u mean,quite the classic,and that same cat photo??some pay attention,some have a genuine interest in this site?
on the surface,some know.particulars.
some have no interests in a receipt for what is owed,or recoginition...but,comments,serve as a check and balance.and could be so right.
eh brutus?


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9/22/2007 9:57:19 PM

 
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