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Photography Question 
Erin  J. Carlson
 

Shooting a Wedding


What is the best mode to shoot a wedding in? Auto for the whole thing or switch to program? I have the Digital Rebel XTi with a 430ex that I think is a flash. This is going to be my first wedding and, of course, I don't want to mess anything up. Also, the bride is pregnant ... about 6 months, I think, by the time the wedding gets here. Any posing suggestions for her so it won't look like she is pregnant?


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7/7/2007 7:06:12 PM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  The best mode is the one that gets you the exposure (ambient and flash), metering pattern, AF mode, depth of field (aperture), motion capture (shutter speed), file size/format, etc., that you want. Any of P, Av, Tv, M will give you control over all of these. Which you choose is a personal preference as to how you get there. If you have to ask, then you aren't prepared to shoot in any mode but Auto (green box). IMHO.


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7/8/2007 6:56:08 AM

 
Oliver Anderson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
  Erin, my friend ... the only thing more difficult than shooting your 1st wedding is making a woman that's in her 3rd trimester look not pregnant. And, as luck would have it, you've managed to combine it into a single shoot! Shoot on Auto mode ... the 430ex is indeed a flash. Good luck and can't wait to hear how this one turns out.
O


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7/8/2007 1:18:36 PM

 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  Well, in this day and age, don't try to hide it too much. Get a few shots without putting emphasis on it - leaning on the alter with her flowers in front of her? Peeking out from behind a wall? Peeking out from behind the groom? Bridesmaids all sitting in front of her? You get the idea. You can't make her not look pregnant, but you can take pictures that don't include the belly.
As for shooting mode, I don't like to shoot in any mode but Aperture Priority unless there is a good reason not to. However, for a flash situation, I may go with something auto. :( More than likely, I'd spend a month obsessing on learning everything I could about flash photography and then go from there. Just haven't had the need yet.
Good luck,
K...


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7/8/2007 6:00:19 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
  Erin,
Remember to angle your subjects. This will help and have her lean forward just a bit, this tends to slim a subject. But, overall, most Pregnantces show. Wishing you the very best in this venture,
Debby


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7/9/2007 7:03:02 AM

 
Daniel O   Hi Erin,
Here's a question for you: what kind of photos are they expecting? If they are wanting traditional wedding photos, there's a "look" to them that you won't get with your present level of expertise. But if they're looking for someone to capture the fun and excitement with candid shots and a few posed ones, go for it! Set your camera on full Auto, (auto focus, exposure, ISO, etc) get a diffuser for your flash and/or learn to bounce your flash (nothing ruins a shot like harsh shadows), and shoot a lot of pictures. No, I mean a LOT. Lastly, (this is the most important part) plan on having as much fun as you possibly can! It'll show in the shots you take.
Good luck!
Dan


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7/10/2007 6:09:18 AM

 
Erin  J. Carlson   Thanks everyone for your advices...I have also just learned that they are thinking of having the wedding outside....however I think that an outside wedding in October in Nebraska of all places might be a fight in its own!!!


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7/10/2007 8:02:49 AM

 
Daniel O   Knowing that the wedding isn't until October, I'll temper my answer -- that's enough time to learn and practice a lot. Maybe you could 'apprentice' with a pro for the summer?
Dan


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7/10/2007 8:40:00 AM

 
ROBERT  F. CUMMINGS   WHEN I SHOT WEDDINGS, I USED THE APPERATURE THAT SUITED THE SHOT THE BEST. YOU HAVE TO ASK YOURSELF, DO I WANT THE BACKGROUND CLEAR OR DIFFUSED? IS THE SUBJECT YOU ARE SHOOTING THE MOST IMPORTANT ITEM IN THE FRAME? I FOUND THAT COMPOSITION WAS USUALLY MORE IMPORTANT THAN WHAT MODE MY CAMERA WAS IN. IF YOU ARE USING A FLASH, WITH THAT CAMERA, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO SET IT ON MANUAL, F:8 AT 1/250 OF A SECOND. THAT WILL GIVE YOU GOOD DEPTH OF FIELD AND THE SHUTTER IS FAST ENOUGH TO STOP ANY MOTION FOR A MORE CLEAR SHOT. IF YOU CAN, PUT A LARGE WHITE BOARD OR DIFFUSER ON YOUR FLASH TO SOFTEN THE LIGHT AND SPREAD IT OUT, SO YOU WON'T GET HARSH SHADOWS. IF YOU HAVE A SHALLOW CEILING, YOU CAN POINT THE FLASH HEAD AT THE CEILING AT ABOUT A 45% ANGLE AND THE LIGHT WILL FILL IN ALL THE SHADOWS FOR YOU. FOR THE BRIDLE POSE, TRY STANDING HER BEHIND THE ARRANGED FLOWERS WITH HER BRIDES MAIDES OR HER HUSBAND. HAVE HER BEHIND THE FLOWERS AND EVERYONE ELSE IN FRONT KIND OF LOOKING TOWARDS THE BRIDE. GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR FIRST WEDDING. IT CAN GET PRETTY HECTIC, SO HANG IN THERE.


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7/10/2007 3:14:35 PM

 
Mark E. Howard   erin: wjile I also prefer aperture priority, I have moved toward manual settings because at times, in a dark church, the shutter speed gets to slow, resulting in a motion blur, even with flash. This is most noticeable when the bridal party and bride are walking up or down the aisle. Be sure to check the shutter speed. After looking at your imiages, you will find things you will want to do different, or better, but don't worry, the bride and groom don't see the photos the same way. They remember the moment and the photos trigger that memory. I think its like hanging wall paper, only you no where the faults lie. Good Luck!


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7/10/2007 7:20:09 PM

 
Ryan Glaze   Erin, I would suggest the wedding course taught by Paul Gero here at Better Photo. I took the course before my first wedding last October and it was a huge boost. From that one wedding, I booked 14 other weddings into 2008.

During the formals and the ceremony, I shoot Aperature priority, but I think Program mode with RAW will suite. I like to create a shallow depth for these photos. For reception photos, I change to Shutter Priority (Tv) and I set it to 1/60th to 1/100th of a second and have the flash ready at all times.

I shoot everything in RAW and convert to JPEG using Adobe Lightroom to correct for any lighting issues I may have encountered. I have also learned to bump up my exposure on my flash by 2/3 to 1 full stop on my external flash (580 EX) since I use a diffuser. I bounce a lot of my flash during the reception to lesson harsh shadows on the wall.

As far as the 6 months pregnant thing goes, I agree with previous posts. Portrait shots of the bride will do wonders...head and shoulders...and hiding the belly with foreground props like walls, alters, people, park benches, etc.

Hope this helps.

Ryan


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7/17/2007 7:30:12 PM

 
Louise Panther   Hey there Erin, I wish you good luck on your first venture im sure you will enjoy your day, Its a real buzz!
Ive got the same camera as you, I find that I shoot well on P? dont know if this is good advice but it works for me, when im shooting auto the skin tones are quite red in an outside shooting. As for the bride being pregnant, Im of a completely different view, Firstly she obvisly knows she will be looking beautifully large, I think by my experience that she will more than want to include her belly(baby) in the shots, some see it as a flaw I certainly dont!.
Last week I did a outside wedding for a couple she was 37 weeks gestation(3wks to go) and she was a pleasure to photograph, and she looked truely lovely and I offered while getting dressed that we do a couple of belly shots using white sheets off the motel bed to cover hidden bits. They have turned out beautiful.


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9/20/2007 2:57:57 PM

 
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