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Photography Question 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
 

...On The Road Again!


I'm heading out next week for yet another road trip...this time through northern Montana toward Glacier NP and into Idaho and points west.
I'm planning to traverse U.S. Highway 2 through Montana and hop off the highway for a few side trips to photograph at a few Wildlife Refuges along the way.
Along my proposed route are Medicine Lake NWR, Bowdoin NWR, and Charles M. Russell NWR.

If anyone has photographed these wildlife areas in mid-June...or has some familiarity with these locales (or any others along my intended route that might be of interest), please let me know if any are worth visiting.

Thanks for your help,

Bob


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6/4/2007 4:30:07 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
  Bob,
Have a great time, Glacier Park is my favorite place in the world!
I hope I can some day go back there.
So, I will be watching your gallery in hopes of seeing your wonderful shots of beutiful heaven's peak.
Wishing you the best on your trip,
Debby


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6/5/2007 9:55:08 AM

 
Dennis Flanagan
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/31/2005
  Good luck staying awake on highway 2 from the North Dakota border to Glacier. Lone, straight and flat.

I just spent a week in Northeast Washington. I saw more black bear this year than I ever remember seeing in the past, at least 2 a day.


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6/5/2007 10:20:36 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Thanks Debby,
Glacier is one place I've always wanted to visit...and I'm sure I'll be coming back with a few "keepers" to post.

Dennis,
I had pretty much the same impression about highway 2 when looking at it on the map and hoped that a few side trips to those preserves might help keep me awake along the way.

I've never photographed black bears in the wild and hope to see some on this trip. Last year at Yellowstone I saw a mama grizzly with cubs but they were too far off for a decent photo.

Bob


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6/5/2007 5:14:29 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
  Bob,
I will contact my mom tommorow and see if she remembers the exact name of the highway near Glasier, a train hauling a few cars of grain turned over years ago and grizzely are known to go there every year.
Most should know though.
and please if possible, go all the way up "Going to the Sun" road to the Glasier, as you get there the walls cry.
shortly after I tried to move to Kalispell,Mt. I saw a Discovery on Parks around the world.
..." Bar none Glaiser National Park is the most beautiful in the world"
.." with more flowering plants then anywhere in the world"
I hope you have so much fun!
Debby


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6/5/2007 9:20:05 PM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  Hey Bob – so, forgot about me again, huh? Okay, now I am really jealous! Here I am sweltering in the summer heat of Massachusetts when, once again, you head off into my old stomping grounds without me! Well, even though I am green with envy, I will try to eek out some time later today to send you off some good ideas for your trip. BTW: while it is certainly true that rt. 2 in Montana gets boring, you can find some good stopping places to get out, walk around and make images. There are many wildlife hot spots along your route. I will check with my friends out there to figure out when and where you can find the best choices this year – it does depend, somewhat, on weather and other yearly factors. The 3 refuges you have mentioned are all tremendous opportunities. I’d suggest checking online to find out what type wildlife will be most active during your visit – migration patterns and current conditions are generally updated on each refuge’s website. Meanwhile, I’ve got to get off to work, but I will get you more info tonight.

Irene


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6/6/2007 4:45:02 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Debby,
Thanks for the tip for the grizzlies.
I didn't have much success getting to within shooting range on my last trip at Yellowstone.
It really helps to know where they frequently have been spotted.
I suppose I could just venture into the wilds with an open jar of honey around my neck and my pockets stuffed with raw meat. (...well, maybe not.) ;)
This trip should be more productive since I've recently upgraded my telephoto capabilities and can pull in those distant "brown specs" a little better.

Irene,
I'm so glad you responded since you have been so helpful in the past.
I'm looking forward to whatever information you can provide that might save time (AND gas) on this trip.

Bob


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6/6/2007 8:34:56 AM

 
Dennis Flanagan
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/31/2005
  Quite a few bears are killed annually around those railroad tracks by trains. The bears are feeding on spilled grain from the passing trains. I know there are measures being taken to reduce the spills in order to fix the mortality rate. Good luck finding them.


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6/6/2007 8:39:34 AM

 
Bob Cournoyer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/9/2003
Contact Bob
Bob's Gallery
bobslens.com
  Might check out the newsletters at photographamerica.com . You can order by mail or download them. They have one on Glacier. I've got several of different areas and they are extremely detailed as far as trails to take, off the beaten path type stuff.
We went to Glacier last year in July...hot one day, freezing cold/blowing the next...dress in layers.. :-)
Bob


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6/6/2007 8:47:27 AM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
  LOL,LOL my goodness Bob, lets not have you do that!
My mom did not remember witch hwy, only knowing it was near White Fish,Mt.
But upon typing in
"Gizzily bears on train tracks, Mt"
This really intresting PDF site came up, try 1/4 page down where it says "Study Area"
SITE:
http://www.dot.state.fl.us/emo/sched/griz.pdf


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6/6/2007 8:53:26 AM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
  BTW artical says Hwy 2
Bob is very right , not unusual for snow in July and August.
Oh and my Mom did say if you need some one to choufer while you shoot,just let her know shes acheing to get back as well,lol.
That woman does love a road trip!lol.


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6/6/2007 8:57:27 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Dennis,
It seems that Man's encroachment into wildlife habitat is a problem everywhere. Here in the eastern states, more whitetail deer are killed on our highways than are harvested by legal hunting methods.

Bob C.,
Thanks for the tip about "dress codes" for the region. I will pack a few of those thick flannel over-shirts...which can offer protection from a cold wind but can be easily shed when things warm up.
I also have an insulated Gore-Tex rainsuit which accompanies me on every trip but I've not had to pull it out yet...(knock wood).

Debby,
Thanks for the link.
And be sure to tell your Mom that I too love road trips!
It's the only way to really see this great land we call home.

Bob


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6/6/2007 9:25:36 AM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  Bob, I tried to e-mail you several pages of info but the system would not accept it. Please send me an e-mail; i.troy@comcast.net and I will directly e-mail you the info.

Irene


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6/6/2007 3:17:09 PM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  Hi Bob – this is in several parts - this is part one:

I am unclear whether you plan to drive through the Dakotas prior to entering Montana or not – actually, I am unclear whether you are flying to some point in MT and renting a car or what. On the chance that you might be driving up through North Dakota let me recommend a stop at Theodore Roosevelt National Park in far western ND. It is one of the least know parks in the system, but has a great deal to offer. If you are planning to go that way let me know and I’ll send you some info.

Okay, Northern Montana: Yes, Rt. 2 is long and can get boring, so take lots of breaks and enjoy some of the scenery.

From the North Dakota border Rt. 2 follows the Missouri river westward toward the Pacific Ocean. As you may already know, this is part of the route that Louis and Clark followed, so be prepared for lots of road side notices about the L&C trail. The first point of interest is Fort Peck Indian Reservation. The reservation has an interesting museum – located outside of Glasgow – along with a natural history exhibit that may be worth the time. There used to be a festival in early July, but I have no idea if they still have this festival, I’d suggest asking once you get into the area. The only other real photo op here is the dam which is just south of Glasgow. If you get there when the light is good the dam is pretty cool. Fort Peck Lake is also pretty and around the time that you will be there you probably will see lots of bird life. You can get up-to-date info in Glasgow or at the Indian Museum.

You asked about the wildlife refuges along Rt. 2. Bowdoin, just east of the small town of Malta, is considered to be one of the most important birding sites in North America. There you will likely see Great Blue Herons, Eagles (bald and golden); American Pelicans and cormorants. There is a short loop road – about 12 miles I think – that will provide good access to most of the refuge. Charles Russell, which includes the Fort Peck Reservoir, is just south of the town of Glasgow. It is a huge reserve that encompasses something like 130 miles of varied terrain. There are high prairie grasslands, river bottom, badlands and foothills. There is quite a bit of scenic potential for images. The bird and other wildlife is extremely varied from small mammals such as prairie dogs, deer, elk, lynx (if you are lucky), fox, and wolverines as well as wolves and bears. Birds include golden and bald eagle, raptors of all types and smaller prairie and grassland species. The reservoir is huge and the dam is interesting and can be a great place for images in early morning or at sunset. I haven’t visited Medicine Lake in years, but remember it as being somewhat disappointing after Russell.

From Malta you continue west into the City of Havre (pronounced Have-her). This is an interesting city with some notable architecture if this is of interest. It can also be a good half-way stopping point if you are tired from driving.

From Havre you continue west to Glacier passing a number of historic markers and several dams. In the tiny town of Browning you might want to stop and visit the Museum of the Plains Indian. Otherwise there is not a whole lot to see. Now you have a decision to make: you can continue on Rt. 2 and drive across the Marais Pass into West Glacier or head north to St. Mary and Glacier National Park. Which ever way you choose, consider driving both routes at some point.


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6/7/2007 3:50:53 PM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  Part Two:

If you decide to follow Rt. 2, you might want to bring some picnic supplies with you so that you can stop at the summit and take in the incredible views. The road climbs gently as it leads west from Browning and then rises sharply as it goes up the pass. This is an amazing drive past incredible towering peaks and very rugged country. There are many, many photo ops all along the way, including water falls, mountains, wildlife and historic markers. At the top of the pass pull into one of the turnouts and look up at the train track. Those are avalanche chutes that protect freight trains from the many avalanches that come every winter. If you are lucky you will catch sight of a train coming through the pass.

At the top of the pass look for the sign to “Goat Lick” on your left (assuming you are heading westward). There is a short trail that leads to the lick. Keep your eyes open for Mountain Goats and perhaps Sheep.

After the pass the road heads down hill passing many turnouts and scenic stops. Keep your eyes open for eagles, deer and coyote. At Essex you might want to stop and visit the Izaac Walton Inn, one of the few remaining railroad inns left. There are numerous places where a short trail will lead you to some amazing scenic possibilities, just take your pick depending on your interests, none will disappoint! Just west of Essex is Belton Hills wildlife area. You may see elk here.

West Glacier: This is a good place to stop and get a local up date on what is happening in the Park and the surrounding area. I am not sure if you know, but this past year has been really rough in the area. There was a major fire last fall followed by a rough winter and even floods this spring. I understand that parts of Going to the Sun road were washed out. You really need to visit the ranger station and get an update. But, don’t fear, from what I understand you can still drive the entire length of the road.

Glacier:

First piece of advice: make sure that you make your lodging reservations ASAP. The good places fill up quickly this time of year. If you plan to stay in the park you can go to: http://www.glacierparkinc.com/Lodging.htm and find out about availability. My favorite in-park place to stay is at McDonald Lodge on the western edge of the park.

Glacier is an amazing place full of photo ops. GTTS road is only 50 miles long, but it can take you all day to drive it if you stop as often as I do. I usually pack a lunch for the summit. As others have already advised, be prepared for extremes in temperatures. It can be 80 in West Glacier and then drop to 40 at the summit. Photographically speaking, take everything you can carry because you will probably use it all. A polarizer is essential and you might want to take a GND filter as well. I’m not going to go into detail about what to see and do because you can get this easily from the Glacier web site. http://www.nps.gov/glac/index.htm


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6/7/2007 3:51:40 PM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  Part Three:

What to see/do around Glacier NP:

On Rt. 2 just west of West Glacier is the town of Hungry Horse. Make sure that you take the side trip to visit Hungry Horse Dam. It is well worth the time. Also, if you enjoy hiking, there is a really nice trail that leads around Blaine Lake – just before you reach the dam follow the signs to the picnic area. The trail leads from the parking lot, through the picnic area itself and then around the lake. Keep your eyes open for Mountain Lion – I once had a much too close for comfort encounter with one here! You may also see osprey, eagle and perhaps elk.

Whitefish Montana is worth a visit. Even though it is touristy, the town offers some nice art galleries and a few good restaurants. One of my favorite places to stay – actually of anyplace I have been – is the North Forty Resort right outside of Whitefish. They have really nice cabins and because they are not right in town, it is quieter. http://www.northfortyresort.com/?gclid=COPT1a-SyIwCFQwzZAodKwNOaw

My favorite restaurant is the Tupelo Grille in downtown Whitefish. It is worth the visit if you are in the mood for great food.

For good photo ops visit Whitefish lake at dawn or sunset.

You said that you are heading toward Idaho. There are several options, depending upon what part of Idaho you are planning to visit. This first route is for Northeastern Idaho and is one of the most scenic drives in this part of the country: from Whitefish take Rt. 93 North. This takes you through parts of Flathead National Forest past many lakes and rivers. Along this route you should see eagles, hawks, deer, elk and perhaps mountain sheep. At the town of Eureka there are several small galleries that might be worth a visit. From Eureka follow route 37 south (yes, I know, you will be going back south after heading north and yes, you will be doubling your route, trust me, its worth the drive!) to Libby Dam. This is the Lake Kodcanusa Scenic Byway and it is really spectacular. You should see all sorts of wildlife, birds and scenery. Libby Dam is quite spectacular and very worthy of stopping for images. Follow Rt. 37 west through Libby and then pick up Rt. 2 again and cross into Idaho.

The other option from Whitefish – and also extremely scenic – is to head south toward Missoula on Rt. 93 South. This road follows Flathead Lake and features some terrific photo ops all along the route. The small town of Polson, at the bottom of Flathead, offers some nice galleries and a wonderful view across the lake northward. As you follow the road keep your eyes open for eagles and other raptors.

From Polson the highway heads south through Mission Valley and past the magnificent Mission Mountain range. Nine Pipe National Wildlife Refuge offers many species of water fowl, but check locally to see what is around when you are in the area. St. Ignatius Mission features a great museum of Indian art and history. The setting is wonderfully photogenic.

I think I might have already told you about the National Bison Range outside of Ravalli. If you haven’t visited there yet, you may want to make this a stop. Try getting to the park before sunrise and then follow the tour road past the visitor’s center and to the top of the hill. From here you can watch the sun come up over the Mission Mountains and, if it is clear, you can get great images of Bison below the hills. The park is home to bison, deer, elk and lots of birds. The last time that I visited I ended up filling a 2gb memory card before the park even officially opened!

If you are going to Idaho you can take Rt. 200 west from the Bison Range through Quinns Hot Springs – worth a stop – and then pick up Rt. 135 to St. Regis. In St. Regis take the Scenic Byway along the river to where it meets with Interstate 90. As you drive toward the Idaho border make sure you pull off at Lookout Pass for pictures. Depending upon the weather, the views from here can be spectacular.

Let me know where you are thinking of going in Idaho and perhaps I can give you some ideas of good photo places.

Irene


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6/7/2007 3:52:11 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
 
 
  Beast Slayer
Beast Slayer
"Watch out grizzlies,...I'll get you THIS time!" :)
© Bob Cammarata
Nikon FM2 Manual E...
 
 
WOW!

What a wealth of great information you are Irene. I'm forever grateful!

I will print your suggestions and add them to my trip log.
...And yes, I will be driving and was planning to spend a night near the ND/MT border. Maybe I'll skip Medicine Lake and check out T.R.N.P instead.

Thanks again,
Bob


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6/7/2007 5:00:13 PM

 
Bob Cournoyer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/9/2003
Contact Bob
Bob's Gallery
bobslens.com
  Holy Cow!!! What is that, Bob???


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6/7/2007 5:06:58 PM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
  Bob,
That is Fantasic!!
I will tell you now , please put my order in for a 10x13 of one of your Gizzily shots!
Really I'd love to buy one and I know you will get what ever your after with THAT Beast of a lens!
Debby


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6/7/2007 5:47:15 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
 
 
  Beast Slayer 2
Beast Slayer 2
© Bob Cammarata
Nikon FM2 Manual E...
 
 
This is something I put together to try to pull in those distant "brown specs".
A M/F Nikkor 600 mm f-4 with two stacked 2X teleconverters mounted on a home made stablizing platform attaches via quick-disconnect to my Bogen tripod. I have an identical head on a home made car door mount for shooting from inside my vehicle.
The effective reach is 2400 mm (at f-16).
It's heavy and cumbersome but I can shoot wide open at 1/250 second at 400 ASA and the results of the first test roll looked suprisingly decent.

Bob


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6/8/2007 2:14:41 AM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  Hi Bob – I’m glad that the info can help you. Maybe I should do this for a living…wait, I do!

You will really like Theodore Roosevelt NP (TRNP). First, you want to stay in the tiny town of Medora N.D. since it is the only place near the park. It is a very small town and while there are some other places to stay nearby, the closest to the park and cleanest place is the Americinn (americinn.com). It is nothing fantastic, but it is clean, close and quiet. As to where to eat…well, most places are decidedly mediocre and somewhat overpriced for what they offer. Personally, most of the time I stop in the town of Dickinson, about 40 miles east, and pick up picnic supplies to enjoy in the park.

The park consists of two sections, north and south. The south unit is easily accessed off of interstate 94. The north unit is about 60 miles north of Rt. 94. Personally, I have always preferred the south unit. If you are traveling via Rt. 94 you will want to stop at the Painted Canyon visitor center just east of the turn off for Medora. Expect to see bison, prairie dogs and perhaps deer. Make sure you get a guide to the park here; there is also a museum about the badlands and Roosevelt. Once in Medora, follow the main road through the center of town and follow the signs to the park – it’s pretty hard to miss since there is not much else around! If at all possible try to set aside a full day for exploring the park.

There is a loop road that runs about 40 miles and circles the southern unit. As you drive toward the hills you will pass multiple prairie dog towns – often there are hundreds of dogs sitting outside their holes. You may also see bison and deer near the road. The first good overlook is Skyline where you can get a nice view of Medora and the badlands below. From here the road climbs steeply to the next plateau. Here you can look down and see the Little Missouri River that helped shape this amazing landscape. The road comes to a T shortly after this point. Take the road to the right and follow the main loop. Along the first 10 miles or so of this loop there are a number of interesting short trails that provide a good introduction to the nature and topography of the badlands. Two of the best are the Ridgeline Nature Trail and the Coal Trail. You will want to pull over at the Badlands Overlook where the view is amazing. In fact, if you get to the area in time, this is a spectacular sight for shooting a wonderful sunset.

As you continue on the loop you will see many opportunities for hiking into the hills that surround the road. Depending upon your interest, each trail offers something a bit different. Keep your eyes open for wildlife including coyote (seen most often around sunset or right after sunrise); mule and whitetail deer, bison and the ever present prairie dogs. Raptors of many kinds often soar over the surrounding cliffs. At the very top of the loop you can pull over and look out toward the east and, when the sky is clear, see for miles. This is a great place for sunrise photos. As you head down the loop you can catch some great images of the Wind Canyon. Everywhere you will see fantastic shapes and incredible colors that photograph beautifully. As you head back to where the loop connects with the main road into the park, you pass the original ranch that was once owned by Roosevelt. They offer horseback riding here during the summer months. The old buildings can make some good photo ops.

Other photo ops include the many varieties of wild flowers that should still be in bloom when you are there. Along the Little Missouri River there are stands of cottonwoods and juniper that may also provide nice background for other shots. Keep in mind that day time temperatures can soar well into the 90’s even in June. At night the temperatures can plummet, so take layers. Also, because of all the sand, if the wind starts to blow you will want to protect your lenses. One other word of caution: this is rattlesnake country, so keep your eyes open when hiking and in the rest areas. Also, as you leave Medora and return to 94, don’t put your camera away. The badlands continue well into eastern Montana and there may still be some good photo ops.

Now, in exchange for all this info you MUST upload some of your great images when you get back! Have a great trip, and if you still have any questions, feel free to e-mail me.

Irene


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6/8/2007 6:18:46 AM

 
Dennis Flanagan
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/31/2005
  Good luck with that lens set up Bob. I am anticipating your results. I shot a lot of bears in the past few weeks. They never came out of the woods until about 7:30 pm, so the window of light is fairly narrow.


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6/8/2007 8:28:35 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Thanks again Irene,
I did print every word of your last few posts and added them to my trip log.

TRNP sounds a lot like The Badlands of South Dakota, with its unique geology, bison, deer and antelope herds and ubiquitous prairie dog towns. (...and "Rattlesnakes"??...Now you're gettin' me really psyched!)
It's definately high on my list for a first stop.

Dennis,
I'm planning to shoot a lot of film near sundown...not only for the increased wildlife activity but for that special "magic light" that prevails.

We're leaving tomorrow so I'll guess I'll check in when I get back.

Bob


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6/8/2007 6:01:11 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Hello all...Just checking in.

We're in northern Utah now and headed toward home. Glacier was beautiful!
The Going to the Sun road was closed from from the Jackson Glacier overlook to the top due to road conscruction but we hiked in to the backcountry and I nailed that bear I wanted...a large grizzly along Ptarmigan Wall.

Bowdoin NWP off Highway #2 is highly recommended for bird photography enthusiasts. The variety of species there will not dissapoint those wishing to add to their "life list" of species seen.

...Gotta go hit the highway. I will check in later and upload images in the coming weeks.

Thanks again to everyone who offered such valuable advice.

Bob


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6/15/2007 7:58:56 AM

 
Debby A. Tabb
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/4/2004
  Thanks Bob, for the note.
and FANTASTIC on that Bear!! I for one can't wait to see it.
I am so envyous and hope you continue to have a great time!


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6/15/2007 8:05:30 AM

 
Irene Troy
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/27/2004
  WOW Bob, that is fantastic about the griz! In all the years that I lived in Montana and visited Glacier and Yellowstone I have only managed to get two good bear images - one a griz and the second a black bear. Having Ptarmigan wall as your background should make a great image. I am sorry you didn’t get to drive the full length of GTS, but, from what I hear from friends, you were lucky to get as far as you did. I am also glad that you found Bowdoin a good bird photog location.

Have a safe trip home and I can’t wait to see you pics!

Irene


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6/15/2007 8:53:37 AM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  I just got home moments ago...after several greuling days on the highways(...from Denver to central Maryland in two days...YIKES!)

It will likely be days (or even weeks) before I've processed, edited and scanned everything worth keeping so the upload process will be gradual and on-going.

I'm really psyched to see how that grizzly came out. He (or she) was about 250-300 yards from the trail near Iceberg Lake. My only regret was that my 600 mm Nikkor had to wait for me back at the car. Being too big and heavy for a 10 mile hike into the backcountry, I packed my smaller super-telephoto lens assembly to travel lighter. (...It still kicked my butt though.)
I shot a few bighorn rams also that day from about the same distance.

Bob


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6/17/2007 8:06:34 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
 
 
  Grizzly 1
Grizzly 1

Glacier NP

© Bob Cammarata
Nikon FM2 Manual E...

 
  Grizzly 2
Grizzly 2

Glacier NP

© Bob Cammarata
Nikon FM2 Manual E...

 
  Grizzly 3
Grizzly 3

Glacier NP

© Bob Cammarata
Nikon FM2 Manual E...

 
 
Hello everyone,

For those interested in that grizzly, I posted a few photos here.
Having just received my batch of developed slides from this trip, the editing/scanning/uploading process will be on-going for days (or weeks).
To accommodate the many requests to see photos I've created a seperate category on my website here to accept all of the scenic and wildlife images from that picturesque region of the northwest.
It will be updated daily so check back from time to time.

Bob



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6/29/2007 5:02:37 PM

 
Pat Wimpee   Oh Bob! That's just like my luck. Run into the shot of a life time and leave your best lens in the car! :(
Looks like you had fun tho.
Pat


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6/30/2007 1:21:45 PM

 
Todd Bennett
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/8/2004
  Bob,

I checked out the shots on your website. They look really good. Hope you had a good time.


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6/30/2007 1:30:15 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Pat,
It was definately a fun trip and I too am sorry that my "biggest gun" had to wait for me back in its holster for that 10 mile hike into the backcountry.
That lens DID come out to play closer to the road...where I only had to carry it (and a much heavier tripod) for a short distance.
The prairie dog portraits were shot with the 600 mm and two stacked 2X teleconverters.

Todd,
Thanks for looking.
There are still a bunch of photos I need to edit, scan and upload.
Hopefully, I'll be done with this project in a week or so.

Bob


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7/1/2007 3:11:28 PM

 
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