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Photography Question 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
 

For Amy H. Maple: HIGH PASS SAMPLE


 
  Amy H. Maple's Photo--High Pass Sample
Amy H. Maple's Photo--High Pass Sample
I used high pass method twice, once to restore detail and tone, once to sharpen.

K...
© Karma Wilson
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This is AMY H. MAPLE'S image. She requested help with this image and I couldnl't post (got error message) under her thread:

High pass sample. Steps to follow in another reply:


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6/4/2007 3:03:49 PM

 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  Amy, this was quick, so not saying it's perfect. Here's my steps:

Because your original photo was so underexposed I ran the high pass filter first in linear dodge layer mode. This made the photo really BRIGHT. But I adjusted opactiy down on the top layer, then merged layers. I touched up the highlight you caught in the eye with the brush tool by selecting a midgray color and painting over the highlight a bit. I burned the centers of the eyes and dodged around the pupile (this may look unnatural to you--since I don't personally know the subject it's hard to guage) I then duplicated the layer again and ran highpass in Multiply and adjusted opacity until I was happy. I added a layer mask, made sure it was black and then painted back the detail in the eye. I adjusted color for skin tone. I duplicated the layer again, ran a noise filter on top layer and erased through to the eyes.

K...


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6/4/2007 3:10:55 PM

 
Amy H. Maple
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/29/2007
  Thanks so much Karma for taking the time to do this and then to post every step.

WoW...it looks good (love the eyes), but sounds like so much work. Maybe it will seem easier once I try to do it. I do not know if I'd be able to perform these steps on every photo I would give a client...I'd be at the computer 24-7.

I'll let you know if I come up w/ something close to what im happy w/.

thanks again


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6/5/2007 12:47:46 PM

 
Amy H. Maple
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/29/2007
  Also,

I shoot w/ a Canon Rebel XT, and most often than not use my 50mm f/1.8 lens. The above shot was taken around 11:30 am on a partly sunny day, not even in the open shade.

here are the settings on my camera:
lens: 50mm
av mode
f 1.8
shutter speed: 1/4000
AWB
ISO:100
exposure level: -2/3 (camera automatically does this in AV mode, I think)

so what is the problem? I am wondering why I continue to get underexposed shots? I know I have a lot to learn, so maybe you guys could help me out. I have a hard time understanding exposure, shutter speed, etc. and how they work together.

My underexposed images are totally correctable (due to editing software), but I still would like to know the "why".


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6/5/2007 1:16:22 PM

 
Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/14/2005
  Amy,
The problem is most likely the -2/3 exposure compensation that is set. This is telling the camera to underexpose every image. The camera doesn't automatically do this. The exposure compensation must have been set (maybe unintentionally) at some point, and the camera saves this setting until you change it.

In Av mode, hold the Av +/- button with your thumb. It is at the upper right corner of the LCD screen.

Then turn the main dial with your shutter finger until the mark on the exposure scale lines up with the 0.

This will cancel out the -2/3 exposure compensation.

You might also try closing your aperture down to maybe f/2.8 instead of f/1.8. You will still get very good background blur - especially when the subject is a good distance from the background like he is in the attached image. Most lenses are sharper when you close down a stop or two from their widest aperture.

Chris A. Vedros
www.cavphotos.com


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6/5/2007 1:39:09 PM

 
Amy H. Maple
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/29/2007
  thanks Chris. I just reset the exposure on my camera :)...wonder how long it has been set to that??? Thanks so much for the info. on av. I tend to shoot at 1.8 a lot...i will bump it up to 2.8.

What about in low light situations? Doesn't the 1.8 allow for more light to come in? For example, say I am in a low-light situation and I can't get to a better place for better lighting. What would your camera settings be?


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6/5/2007 1:48:46 PM

 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  Amy, glad I could help. If you get a better exposure in camera you don't need nearly as many steps. The noise reduction and first linear dodge high pass were just to deal with the underexposure.

I can selectively sharpen a photo in under a minute. It becomes easy as you develop a workflow and get used to it. Your photo required extra steps to bring out detail. Also, if you aren't using a reflector you should consider it. It will make your photoshop eye touchup much less stressful.

K...


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6/5/2007 2:07:53 PM

 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  Amy, I suggest you get the book "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson. I will really help you get intuitive about your metering and exposure settings. If you understand these two things and how they work together, you will know exactly when you need to use 1.8 or 2.8, etc... That book has opened up my photography world a ton. I still forget to change settings, and I still make plenty of mistakes--but I have WAY less problems to fix in Photoshop now and if I stop to think it out, I have a general understanding of what settings I require in camera.

K...


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6/5/2007 2:12:36 PM

 
Amy H. Maple
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/29/2007
  You guys are amazing...again, thanks so much. I am going to get that book asap. I've had it written down to buy for about 2 mos. now...i guess it is time to do it!


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6/5/2007 2:15:59 PM

 
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