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Photography Question 
Denise Woldring
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/17/2007
denisewoldringphotography.com
 

what filter? grand canyon


I'm a novice photographer. Going to the Grand Canyon Sky-Walk. I have a Rebel G camera. What filter should I use.


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4/17/2007 6:53:31 AM

 
Alan N. Marcus   Hi Denise,

Reducing the effects of haze at altitude is accomplished using a “skylight” filter. Nowdays called a UV filter. The main effect is the slight reduction of bluishness in pictures made in shade or overcast days. Mist and fog scatter UV light. The UV haze filter provides some haze penetration at high altitudes.

A polarizing filter (screen) is a must. The polarizing screen darkens sky without changing the scene color. Most purchase “circular” type as this design presents no interfere with camera automation such as auto-focus or exposure sensors etc. The polarizing filter also functions as a UV haze filter thus is does double duty. The polarizing screen must be rotated for effect. The design of the mount allows the user to manually rotate the filter while on the camera. As the filter is rotated you can observe as it increases color saturation – darkens sky – subdues reflections from many surfaces like glass and water etc.

Alan Marcus
ammarcus@earthlink.net


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4/17/2007 7:24:41 AM

 
Denise Woldring
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/17/2007
denisewoldringphotography.com
  Hi Alan,
Thanks for the tip. I just purchased a polarizing filter (expensive!). I will be there in 2 weeks. One more question: What would be the best film to use?
Denise


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4/17/2007 10:48:41 AM

 
Alan N. Marcus   Hi Denise,

Not an easy question as I don't know how you will be viewing your pictures.

For starters:
Film equates to a tool. You chose which tool to use based on what you wish to accomplished.

If you want slides:
Kodak Professional Elite Chrome 100
Kodak Professional Elite Chrome Extra 100 (more vivid)
Fuji Velvia 50

If you want prints
Kodak Gold 200 (local one-hour shops handle this best)

Have a great time,

Alan Marcus
ammarcus@earthlink.net


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4/17/2007 11:23:21 AM

 
Sharon  Day
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  Wow, Denise, you're actually going to stand on that thing?? LOL. I hope you get great photos! Good luck!


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4/17/2007 5:47:04 PM

 
Denise Woldring
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/17/2007
denisewoldringphotography.com
  Yes, I'm nervous about it.


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4/17/2007 6:19:37 PM

 
Sharon  Day
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  If you're nervous make sure you have the tripod along so there's no camera shake ;)! Wish I was heading to the Grand Canyon this time of year. It gets pretty hot on the South Rim in the summer.


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4/17/2007 8:03:36 PM

 
anonymous 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/7/2005
  Get yourself a Neutral Density Grad filter as well, that way your sky isn't blown out in the photos.


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4/17/2007 11:01:08 PM

 
Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/17/2005
  Let's see, if you're standing on the skywalk facing down and photographing into the canyon, why would you need to be concerned about blowing out the sky since the sky should be, in theory anyway, 180 degrees above you. I'm confused ;<(

Mark
============
I went through the painted desert once but it was closed for redecorating.


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4/18/2007 9:27:31 AM

 
Denise Woldring
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/17/2007
denisewoldringphotography.com
  Mark
I will also be in other parts of the Canyon.

Denise


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4/18/2007 12:01:07 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Add to your list of films a handfull of rolls of Provia 100 slide film.
The color rendition will be very close to how your eyes and brain perceived this special place.
A warming filter will be beneficial if you plan on shooting early or late in the day. Without it there will be a descernible blue cast.


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4/18/2007 4:44:51 PM

 
Scott H.   I read somewhere that cameras are not allowed on the Sky Walk (tripods either, of course).


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4/18/2007 5:18:46 PM

 
Sharon  Day
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  You would definitely want to know about that before paying to walk out on it. I think I heard it costs $20. South Rim of the Grand Canyon has wonderful views and cameras are allowed there.


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4/18/2007 5:35:02 PM

 
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