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Photography Question 
Lloyd Olson
 

Digital Lighting for Jewelry Photos


 
  Many Mistakes
Many Mistakes
different lightings but same results
© Lloyd Olson
 
 
I am trying to take pictures of jewelry I make to put on a Web page. I am having a devil's time trying to get it lit properly so that it shows the detail of gold and stones. My Kodak has an 8" Macro and I am at present trying 68 watt GE Photofloods.... no luck. I am desperately looking for an inexpensive solution and would welcome any suggestions. Thanks. 3's
Grampa


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12/12/2001 11:35:30 PM

 
Terry L. Long   I've had success with this type of subject (small & shiny) by using a homemade "light tent". Basically I covered/tented my subject with a (gulp...clean) white sheet. I cut a hole in the tent for my lens to stick through. I then shone three photofloods on the tent until I got the lighting I wanted. I used a 35mm SLR therefore, the metering was pretty simple.


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12/14/2001 2:02:18 AM

 
David    Actually the best way is the buy a light box they make for jewelry photography. However, you can get away by using a daylight bulb they sell at the Home Depot and bouncing it to a white reflection. If you want to get a softer image, then I suggest you build a light tent just like the one on this link http://bermangraphics.com/coolpix/jewelryphoto.htm.


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2/8/2002 9:44:15 PM

 
Marian Smit   I have made quite a lot of photographs of jewelry, and got very good results with a Sony Mavica FD7 using macroshot. I made the pictures at daytime (no artificial lighting needed - no flash) and lightfall coming from the South. With the Mavica you can come rather close to the object, so you do not get that unwanted shiny effect.


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2/22/2002 7:27:53 AM

 
Paul    Macro settings would be my choice with a sturdy tripod to minimize vibrition.This applies to digital photography.


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4/23/2002 7:07:58 PM

 
Paul   
 
 
Macro settings would be my choice with a sturdy tripod to minimize vibrition.This applies to digital photography.


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4/23/2002 7:08:32 PM

 
Tom Darmody   I agree with all the other posters advice, soft light, macro mode, and a tripod.

I want to add one more thing, the background. Try a muted background, the red is way to bright. black or an "earthy" color (olive, tan, ect...)would work a whole lot better.


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6/5/2002 4:02:39 PM

 
Jannette D.    I've been playing with overcast weather and using my cheap digital camera on macro with a tri pod or the edge of the table to avoid the shakes and blurs. I display my studio jewelry on a white roll sheet of paper that is is a form of a slope. I use a tiny blob of putty to hold up rings at a 45 degree angle so it looks like the jewelry is floating. To my surprise the pictures turned out remarkable without any yellow tint in the sterling metal and any kind of shadows. I live on the coast of California and have to wake up early in the mornings to achieve a good thick overcast morning of photoshooting with all natural lighting. Any kind of holes in the clouds will result with yellow tinting in the metal.


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6/16/2003 10:26:15 AM

 
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