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Photography Question 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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warming effect


If I set my camera's white balance to cloudy, even though the conditions were not cloudy, would it be the same as using a warming filter?


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9/28/2006 11:16:20 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Yes, adds a little yellow orange. Set to tungsten, adds a little blue.
Experiment with custom white balance by setting it with different colors.(construction paper, your clothes, something like that)


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9/28/2006 11:27:25 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  Thanks, Gregory.

I was considering the purchase of a
Warm Black Diffusion F/X 1. However, I have a black diffusion filter, and was wondering if I set the camera to cloudy and used the black diffusion filter, if the results would be similar to the Warm Black Diffusion F/X 1?

If it makes any difference, I'm learning to use my Canon 20D.

Thanking you in advance.


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9/28/2006 11:38:06 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Never heard of a warm black filter.


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9/29/2006 12:44:07 AM

 
Rebecca A. Steed
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/6/2005
  When I am taking outdoor portraits of people, usually around sunset when the sun is shining directly on the person at their level, I ALWAYS set my WB to cloudy, because it gives it a very appealing 'tan' color to the skin. In fact, I usually shoot my outdoor photos in white balance cloudy whether people are in the shot or not. Now, if it's early morning at dawn and I want a 'cold' feel to the picture, I set it to auto or tungsten. Keep in mind, you can also apply some photo filters in photoshop.


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9/29/2006 5:44:30 AM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  Gregory,
Tiffen and other manufacturers make both Black Pro-Mist (diffusion) filter and Warm Black Pro-Mist filter, amongst others. They range between $74 and $86 each.
http://www.tiffen.com/userimages/BPM_WBPM.pdf
The better filters keep the sharpness of your original image, but diffuse.

I bought it because my daughter often has an imperfect complexion and because I wanted to take some pictures at her recent wedding. The beauty of the filter was amongst other things, that not only was her complexion diffused, and any blemishes less noticeable, but her radiant smile (plus the filter) made the images just glow. It was a very appealing look, taken in the late afternoon with warm light.

I had wanted the warm-black pro-mist, but the company from whom I ordered, was out at the time.

Thank you for your response, Becky. That's just the answer for which I was looking.



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9/29/2006 7:08:21 AM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  Gregory,
Tiffen and other manufacturers make both Black Pro-Mist (diffusion) filter and Warm Black Pro-Mist filter, amongst others. They range between $74 and $86 each.
http://www.tiffen.com/userimages/BPM_WBPM.pdf
The better filters keep the sharpness of your original image, but diffuse.

I bought it because my daughter often has an imperfect complexion and because I wanted to take some pictures at her recent wedding. The beauty of the filter was amongst other things, that not only was her complexion diffused, and any blemishes less noticeable, but her radiant smile (plus the filter) made the images just glow. It was a very appealing look, taken in the late afternoon with warm light.

I had wanted the warm-black pro-mist, but the company from whom I ordered, was out at the time.

Thank you for your response, Becky. That's just the answer for which I was looking.

I've received good advice from both of you and it's just what I wanted.



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9/29/2006 7:34:06 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  I was getting tripped up on a filter being black. But it looks like it's called black diffusion because it diffuses, but it dosen't have that white foggy look. Hence the name black-diffusion.


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9/29/2006 10:22:36 AM

 
W.    Optical filters apply their effect to the whole image. With everything in it.
That may not always be desirable.
Sometimes you may want to apply the diffusion very locally to the image. For instance to skin blemishes in someones face. But keep the rest of the image in focus, or at least as is.
You can do that in Photoshop: carefully select the area you want diffused with the magic wand, then apply one of the blur filters.
On-screen the effects can be judged instantly.


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9/29/2006 3:51:45 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  I didn't understand what the filter looked like before it was ordered. It's called a black diffusion filter, and yes, it diffuses. But, when viewed, it looks like net stockings have been pulled across the filter. I suppose one could pull net stocking across, but I didn't have time for trial and error guessing.

I was told that the filter would diffuse facial lines and blemishes, which it does. The bride provided the radiance, and the filter made her glow. Because the wedding took place in the late afternoon, I may not have need a warm filter (especially since the company from which I ordered and who could deliver the very next day, did not have the warm black pro-mist in stock.

However, I do wish I were able to use my 420 EX flash. I brought extra batteries, which I would have needed because for some strange reason the batteries in my flash were dead. I had not used them since checking and replacing them into the flash prior to leaving home 4 days earlier. At the last minute, I was unable to locate my other charged batteries. I suspect that my daughter, who did not want my camera in her face, mischievously hid the working batteries. She threatened to throw them in the lake.

If she did, she may regret that decision if her photographer-friend does not come through with his finished images.

I know better than to shoot a backlighted image without a fill flash or bounce. But, this is just another reason why the mother of the bride should not be a sole image collector.


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9/29/2006 4:57:14 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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If I can remember how to upload images, I'll try to show you the results of the filter.

Keep in mind, I should have used a flash to fill in the shadows. The flash in my camera was too small, as the subjects were about 20 feet away. It would have to be the 420EX or greater, and those batteries were strangely dead.

~Bunny


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9/29/2006 7:59:09 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  Use of black diffusion FX3 filter
Use of black diffusion FX3 filter
The camera, which I still learning to operate is a Canon EOS 20D. Shutter, 1/30th@f.3.5. Partial metering set because of backlighting. ISO 100.
Canon EF 28-135 MM F/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens set to 28 mm in vertical position. IMG size=2544x1696; image quality, fine. Flash off (I was too far away for the in-camera flash and my batteries were dead in the 420EX, despite charging them earlier that day..I suspect that since my daughter did not want me to photograph her, she may have killed the batteries.)

The focus was preset at Al. The camera setting said this was taken on September 2, 2006 at 18:42:59 CDT. However, we were in a fishing camp in Forest City, Maine up by New Brunswick.

The image itself, I like. I am shooting myself over and over again because I didn't take my time to find the batteries. But, inability to walk well, plus being the mother of the bride, made this all too frantic.
© Bunny Snow
Canon EOS 20D Digi...

 
 
C:\CANON D20\HES&DEN wedding\IMG_2231_500x659@72ppi.jpg

I cannot remember how to upload this image. Can anyone help me?

I wish to illustrate the appearance of the black FX3 diffusion filter.

Bunny@bunnysnow.us


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9/29/2006 8:10:02 PM

 
Jason A. Woodcock   shot in raw and you can change WB after the fact


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9/29/2006 9:05:56 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  I would have shot in raw, but I left my other 1 gb compact flash card at home (in Louisiana) along with the extra battery and charger. Too much on my mind at the time.

However, I've found another problem that I need to handle first before I can work in raw, and (correct me if I'm wrong but,) don't I need Adobe CS or CS2 in order to work in RAW. I can read it with the EOS Viewer Utility, but cannot figure out how to make changes to a copy with PS7.

If you can walk me through how I can accomplish getting the most out of my raw images, I'd be greatly thankful.

I think I can also alter the light somewhat, based on what I've read by working in Raw. But, I don't have a clue how to accomplish this.

Looking forward to your answer..and thanking you in advance.


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9/29/2006 11:33:39 PM

 
Jason A. Woodcock   open the raw file in canons zoombrowser then high light the image then right click and process camera raw. make your canges then save as a tiff.you should have a copy of zoombrowser in your canon utilitys folder.
JAW


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9/29/2006 11:48:32 PM

 
W.    "[...] the mother of the bride should not be a sole image collector."

The mother of the bride should be the mother of the bride! The WHOLE day.
The mother of the bride should NOT be taking pictures at her daughter's wedding. No one in the bridal party should.
Get someone dedicated to the task of the wedding photography (and that task ONLY).


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9/30/2006 4:34:20 AM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  I have to agree with you, W.S.
My daughter planned her entire wedding herself and by cc'ing the rest of us. But, she did all the preparation and paid for much of the costs. When the cost of a trustworthy professional came up, she asked a friend, whose work she found creative.

I hope that "friend" knows what he's doing because the way I was taught: to shoot in open shade, or turn the subject so their back is in the sun, and not let sunlight fall on their body, did not hold true with the way he set up and captured images. Nor, did either of us used off-camera flashes. (I couldn't because I could not handle a tripod and walk with most of my weight on a cane due to a total hip replacement months before.) But, I don't know his excuse.

I wanted to pay for a trustworthy pro, but as the wedding moved further and further away from civilization, the costs became prohibitive.

Hence, I wanted to capture a few pictures of her and her husband afterwards, which would elicit good expressions, without pressure.

I had wanted to photograph them in open shade, but my "contrary little quail" of a daughter wanted to be photographed by the lake. The light direction coming off the water, proved to be a bit too contrasty until the sun was down; but the sky still light.

Yes, I needed to use my tripod (and it was available in our cabin). But, I found it difficult to hobble with a cane, a tripod and the flash, and so the camera came with me and the other was left behind. That was a mistake.

We are still waiting for her photographer-friend to deliver his pictures. It's only been 28 days...and counting.

As for Jason's response: I'll look for the zoombrowser in the Canon Utility folder. Thanks.


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9/30/2006 7:20:43 AM

 
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