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Photography Question 
Lyndon G. Osmond
 

Raw Files


I use my 20D on the Raw + Large file, but when I download it to the computer the file is in Jpeg format. How do I get at the Raw file to change the white balance?


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8/4/2006 7:37:17 PM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  The editing program does not recognize the latest Canon RAW format. See if there is an update for your software, or use the Canon software that came with the camera.


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8/5/2006 6:27:47 AM

 
Lyndon G. Osmond   Thank you I'll try that


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8/5/2006 5:09:12 PM

 
Bill Sirinek
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/27/2005
  Raw + Large means the camera is writing a raw file AND a jpeg file for each exposure, in this case.. large, the full 8 megapixels. You must be opening up the jpeg file.

Your camera came with some software called EOS Photo Viewer (or something like that) which is excellent for opening up your RAW images and changing a bunch of settings just as if you were setting them on camera before making the shot. It's not a photo "editor" like Photoshop, but you can make setting changes to your raw files and save them.

Load it up and give it a shot, I think you will be pleasantly surprised!


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8/8/2006 6:22:37 AM

 
Hardeep    Try a card reader. You should be able to see the raw files on the card. copy them over to your computer and do whatever


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8/8/2006 7:01:55 AM

 
Ralph L. Nuerenberg   A couple fairly inexpensive options: Photoshop Elements 4 will bring up RAW files both in the Organizer program and Editing program. Another software package that brings them up fast is Bibble (check them out on the web).


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8/8/2006 8:48:35 AM

 
Judy T. Howle   You have to use a raw converter before you can work on the files as tiffs or jpegs in a photo editor. The Canon DPP software that comes with the 20D (and can be updated with the latest version on Canon's website) can be used to convert the images. I have a 20D myself. I prefer and use both Adobe Photoshop CS2 and Photoshop Elements 4, which I teach locally, with the latest v. 3.4 Adobe Raw Converter which includes the latest cameras and updates, for my raw conversions. As previously mentioned, Bibble also makes a nice raw converter but a bit pricey.

If you use Elements 4, you double click on the raw file in the browser and it opens in the camera raw dialog box where you can edit it. Then you can open it into the Elements Editor and fine tune it and then print or save it in several formats such as the native psd format so you can save it as a master to use again for printing at a different size (always sharpen after re-sizing!). You can also save as a tif or jpg or use Save for the Web for email or posting on a website.

Judy


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8/8/2006 9:46:55 AM

 
  for some reason the computer doesn't acknowledge raw files straight from the 20D. using a card reader will get the raw file onto your computer.


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8/8/2006 12:23:50 PM

 
Lyndon G. Osmond   Then I assume my problem was when I chose Raw+JPEG both files did't download at the same time as one file and I've been deleting my Raw files after the JPEG files were uploaded?
I've had my camera for two years but, I just started using Raw files last month before my holidays.


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8/14/2006 5:03:33 AM

 
Judy T. Howle   They should download at the same time as long as you pick all of the images to download. I hope you are using a card reader, much better than using the camera. Transfer all images to the computer and then view them. Get the free faststone image viewer or from Microsoft, the free Raw Image Viewer (I prefer FastStone, much faster viewing. http://faststone.org/) It will allow you to see raw images.


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8/14/2006 1:14:32 PM

 
Bob Chance
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/19/2006
  Windows does not recognize RAW files when read directly from the camera.

Any digital camera cable connected to the computer, Windows automatically looks for specific picture file formats such as TFF, JPG, etc... which is why none of your RAW images are visible.

Even if you were to open up 'My Computer' and click on your cameras icon, after connecting it to the computer of course, you wouldn't even see any icons for the RAW images, only the JPG's.

However, if you have a card reader Windows will recognize your RAW files, but not as picture files, only as data files. But then you could select them from the card and tell Windows to copy them to a specific drive/folder. From there, you can open them with whatever editing program you have that supports Canons RAW format.

I use Digital Photo Professional that comes on the CD with the camera. If you don't have it, you can download it for free from Canons website. EOS Photo Viewer, which also came with your camera, can also be used to view and edit RAW images. However, the DPP has more editing capabilities and scene modes. It can also be used to edit jpg.


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8/14/2006 2:25:10 PM

 
Judy T. Howle   I didn't know that Bob. I have never hooked my 20D to the computer to upload images but obviously there has to be some way to get them off the camera such as the Canon software which I have never used after trying it once.I prefer Photoshop ACR and may purchase dXo Optics when v.4 comes out. Or wait till the next v. of Photoshop comes out in the spring and see if they have improved ACR.

Judy


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8/16/2006 6:21:09 PM

 
Bob Chance
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/19/2006
  Yeah Judy:

Windows calls it "File Association". Just as certain files are associated with the programs that created them. Say if you want to open a 'Word' document, by clicking on the document icon, Windows automatically launches Word and opens your document in it for you.

In the same way, Windows associates certain file types with some hardware.
However, probably because there are so many different RAW formats out there, Microsoft choose not to include them as a recognizable part of the file associations. Rightly so, as almost everytime a new digital camera comes out, it has it's own unique RAW file format. I think Canon is up to at least three now.
I'm sure the Canon software will recognize the RAW files and you should be able to use that to upload them directly to the computer. I don't use the cable method myself as it's easier to pop the card into a reader than trying to line up that tiny USB/Fireware cable with the connector on the camera. My eyes ain't what they used to be. LOL!!!
Either way, once uploaded, I can open, view and edit them in the Digital Photo Professional program and then save them as either TFF or JPG and edit them further in another program.


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8/16/2006 6:45:44 PM

 
Ralph L. Nuerenberg   Here is a simple solution for you. Adobe has a RAW conversion package in beta version for feedback - LIGHTROOM. Go to Adobe Labs website, download a free trail package - (check to see if it supports your camera) - have fun; its a decent RAW conversion software package.


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8/17/2006 7:41:58 AM

 
Judy T. Howle   I only use a card reader and don't have any trouble viewing the files on the card since I downloaded and installed the free Microsoft raw viewer. Sometimes I have to look at them on the card if I haven't formatted it to make sure I don't upload the ones I already uploaded. Then I can also view them with the raw viewer after I upload them and I can click on Thumbnail view and see them as thumbnails. However it's much faster to use the FastStone Image Viewer to go through them and delete the non-keepers. It's a great viewer. Someone who has a 5D put me onto it.

Judy Howle
http://southern-exposures.net
http://ImageEvent.com/jhowle


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8/17/2006 10:46:43 AM

 
Ralph L. Nuerenberg   You might want to take a look at LIGHTROOM - its a preview of where software for processing RAW images is going. Right now its free. (I use a 5D).


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8/17/2006 10:49:22 AM

 
Lyndon G. Osmond  
 
 
I have had a card reader as long as Iíve had a camera, but never used it because the cord for connecting my camera to the computer is much more convenient.
Recently while on vacation I started using Raw + JPEG files and my camera seemed to be only uploading the JPEG files. When I finally used the card reader, thanks to you people, to upload my pics I noticed all the empty folders from the Raw files which were never uploaded and were inadvertently lost as I deleted the pictures on my camera.
Now I use Raw Viewer and Digital Photo Professional before I edit in Photoshop 7 and wow what a difference in the quality.
Which brings me to the new question. What is the easiest and/or best way to fix JPEG pics taken with the wrong white balance settings? The pic attached is a sample of one taken with the wrong settings.

Lyndon Osmond


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8/20/2006 9:13:38 PM

 
Bob Chance
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/19/2006
  Lyndon:

Upon examining your photo, I would say you have a pretty good shot at getting a good white balance from the light house in the backgound.
In whichever program you are using, you want to look in your drop down list of tone and color controls. It might be under the "Format" heading or "Enhance".
You want the control labeled "White Balance" of "Color Cast". With this box open, your cursor may change to a crosshair or an eyedropper.
What you want to do, is use this cursor to select a portion of your image that should either be neutral white, grey or black.
The foam in the water seems white to the naked eye, but in reality, it reflects a lot of sky, so it might not be a good choice for color correction. That is why I suggest the lighthouse in the background. You may have to first enlarge the picture to insure you pick up ony the white pixels and no surrounding colored pixels.
You might even have to try a couple of different areas to get the color you are looking for and then you might have to readjust brightness and contrast in levels afterwards.

Good luck. Upload you print when you are done so we can see how you made out.


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8/21/2006 2:06:30 PM

 
Lyndon G. Osmond  
 
 
Inorder to adjust white balance in Photoshop 7; go to Image, Adjustments then Levels. You will see three eyedroppers, one each for grey, black and white. I used the grey eydropper and the rocks under the lighthouse as a sample. Thanks. Now I have work to do.


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8/21/2006 9:03:22 PM

 
Lyndon G. Osmond  
 
 
Pictures adjusted on my laptop look fine when I fix them, but look dark on other computers.


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8/22/2006 6:47:46 PM

 
Bob Chance
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/19/2006
  Even so, the color looks much better. Congrats!


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8/22/2006 7:00:31 PM

 
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