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Photography Question 
Lisa Reimer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/31/2005
 

What causes noise in a photo?


I have been having trouble with noise in some of my images for family pictures. I am using a low ISO, 200 usually for outdoorphotos. I am trying to use the middle range of my lens as well as aperture e.g. 70-300mm lens, I try not to use the full 300mm often, and try to stay around F11. I am also using flash. What other areas should I be looking at to be the cause of my problem? My camera is a Nikon D70s and I am using the SB 600 flash. If anyone can help I would really appreciate it.


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7/7/2006 7:42:17 PM

 
Mike Rubin
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/15/2004
  Can you post an example? The only setting you did not mention is the shutter speed. Are you sure it is "noise"?


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7/7/2006 8:03:20 PM

 
Lisa Reimer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/31/2005
 
 
 
Thanks for being willing to trouble shoot with me. Here is a picture I took of some friends, 1/125,f8, ISO 200, Nikon 70-300mm lens focal length 70mm, with flash. If you pull it up close at 100% the clarity just doesn't seem to be there. I guess I'm not sure if it is noise. On this particular lens I know subjects go soft at 250-300mm, do I want to stay away from 70mm too?


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7/10/2006 2:17:17 PM

 
Lisa Reimer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/31/2005
 
 
 
Thanks for being willing to trouble shoot with me. Here is a picture I took of some friends, 1/125,f8, ISO 200, Nikon 70-300mm lens focal length 70mm, with flash. If you pull it up close at 100% the clarity just doesn't seem to be there. I guess I'm not sure if it is noise. On this particular lens I know subjects go soft at 250-300mm, do I want to stay away from 70mm too?


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7/10/2006 2:19:31 PM

 
Lisa Reimer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/31/2005
 
 
 
Thanks for being willing to trouble shoot with me. Here is a picture I took of some friends, 1/125,f8, ISO 200, Nikon 70-300mm lens focal length 70mm, with flash. If you pull it up close at 100% the clarity just doesn't seem to be there. I guess I'm not sure if it is noise. On this particular lens I know subjects go soft at 250-300mm, do I want to stay away from 70mm too?


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7/10/2006 2:19:46 PM

 
Lisa Reimer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/31/2005
  Sorry, I messed up there. I should be doing this when I am not going to be disturbed or interupted.


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7/10/2006 2:23:33 PM

 
Lisa Reimer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/31/2005
  The picture is in my gallery and titled Family Freinds. Sorry for all the confusion here. This is why I usually wait for my children to be in bed!


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7/10/2006 2:39:59 PM

 
Bob Chance
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/19/2006
  Lisa:

I checked out the photo in question, but from the uploaded image displayed on my monitor, I see very little noise.
However, the main subjects are slightly underexposed. I don't know if you already corrected for a more drastic underexposure than what I'm viewing.
There are several things that can contribute to noise. Underexposure is one of them.
A high ISO setting is another.
Still another, is exceptionally long shutter speeds.
One more thing that can contribute to noise is a dark background, such as taking night photos of the sky or some such thing.
Not knowing what ISO you shot your friends at, I would have to assume that whatever noise you are seeing, is probably due to underexposure. Unless of course you were shooting at a high ISO like 800. Otherwise, I think it's a pretty good shot. Subjects could be a little lighter, that's all.


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7/10/2006 4:23:35 PM

 
anonymous 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/7/2005
  She used ISO 200, but I think it is due to underexposure, and then maybe trying to lighten their faces up in PS or similar.

Altough it is easier to fix an underexposed photo than an over exposed shot, it depended on how under exposed it is. maybe one to two stops under is maximum. But the more underexposed it is, the more noise you will receive as you lighten it.

Next time you take a shot like this, go in close to the subjects, take a reading from them (ie their skin) then move back and compose and focus the shot, the camera will tell you the shot is going to be overexposed, but only the background (cause it is signficantly lighter than the people).

Nat


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7/10/2006 4:37:53 PM

 
Lisa Reimer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/31/2005
  Thank you. After doing some more reading and having you help me out, I think your right. Thank you for the tip on how to fix it too! I really appreciate the help.
I am glad for your willingness to share your knowledge and help people with little experience improve. Now to try out the new ideas! Thanks so much! Lisa


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7/10/2006 6:37:52 PM

 
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