BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
anonymous 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/7/2005
 

Ok, got my Tafe exam tonight (Junior Collage)


Anyone wanna throw some questions at me, to see if I know them (ok boys nothing too hard), just basic to medium general knowledge B&W and Digital questions.


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6/19/2006 8:27:17 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  What's a Tafe exam?


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6/20/2006 12:42:37 AM

 
Justin G.
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/13/2004
  I believe Tafe is either her college name or an exam name in the Oz. BTW Natalie we have some Aussies running around here on my base and they are friggin hilarious!

What is Chromatic Aberration (CA)?


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6/20/2006 1:14:13 AM

 
anonymous 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/7/2005
  Well GUYS...

I PASSED!!! both exams!!!!

Whoooo hoooooo

I don't know what I got, but I passed, and that is all that counts.

Oh and with another assignment I did, I got 48/50 - I am STOKED!!! This was a time of day assignment - I had to take photos of a certain scene at different times of day and analyise the shadows, density, histograms etc.

Oh - Tafe is like Junior Collage in America.


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6/25/2006 6:11:27 PM

 
Pete H
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/9/2005
  Hmmmm?

Ok..

How does the refractive index of Crown Vs Flint glass, affect overall image quality in multi-element design?

We can back it down a tad if ya' want? :)


Pete


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6/25/2006 7:43:16 PM

 
Mike Hollman
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/27/2000
  OK, Here's one that you should get...

Which has the wider color gamut, sRGB or Adobe RGB. What's the best medium for each?

Cheers, from New Zealand.

Mike.


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6/25/2006 7:49:42 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  OK,...Here's a few:

-What does "APO" and "ED" signify when describing telephoto lens design and elaborate why these acronyms are so important to the knowledgeable lens buyer.

-Define "rear-curtain sync", and list an example of when it should be utilized.

-If you were on a critical shoot with an all-manual camera and your meter failed,...what would you do?


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6/25/2006 9:16:00 PM

 
anonymous 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/7/2005
  Ok...

Although my exam's are done, I try and answer what I can (it can never hurt).

Pete H

Sorry darl, don't know that one, I am only a first year.

Mike H

Adobe RGB is wider, but not sure which medium is best for each.


Bob C

You must be a teacher - they are very similar questions to what we got in our exam.

Ok, I could probably find out, but without research, I don't know APO and ED.

Rear Curtain Sync (which my camera is set on!) is when the flash goes off just before the second curtain covers the film/sensor. This allows the film/sensor to be exposed by ambient light then a burst of flash ensures the forground is well lit. Suitable for low light situations, when you want detail in the background, birthday candles and any other photograph in low light where detail in background and forground are required.

Critical Shoot. Well, if it was on a sunny day, then I would set the apeture to f16 and 1/ISO speed. If it was a cloudy day, then one stop under f8 and so forth. But I really only know the "sunny 16 rule".

So guys - how did I go.......


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6/25/2006 9:52:15 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Good Answers!

Rear curtain sync is most beneficial when using a long shutter to show motion.
Let's say you are photographing a ballerina doing a dance routine. The shutter opens and starts exposing ambient light and the motion is recorded as a soft blur.
The flash fires just before the shutter closes and the action of the dancer is frozen at the end of the routine.


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6/26/2006 2:08:01 AM

 
Bob Chance
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/19/2006
  Pretty good for a first year.

What's chromatic aberration?
What ways are used in lens construction to correct for it?


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6/26/2006 5:06:57 PM

 
anonymous 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/7/2005
  Chromatic Aberration?

Errr, I think we covered this briefly (I mean a 10mins chat) but I can't remember - is it something to do with the lens design. Oh I don't know, hang on I'll look it up - sorry cheating a bit:

"Chromatic aberration or "color fringing" is caused by the camera lens not focusing different wavelengths of light onto the exact same focal plane (the focal length for different wavelengths is different) and/or by the lens magnifying different wavelengths differently. These types of chromatic aberration are referred to as "Longitudinal Chromatic Aberration" and "Lateral Chromatic Aberration" respectively and can occur concurrently. The amount of chromatic aberration depends on the dispersion of the glass"


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6/26/2006 6:16:07 PM

 
Bob Chance
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/19/2006
  Okay! So you don't get the bonus points for having to look it up, but well done.
Simply put, chromatic aberration occurs because different colors actually focus at a different plane. On cheap lenses notably, if you have anything of the color red in your subject, upon close examination of the picture, you would notice fringing around the edges. This is because red, being of the lower wavelength isn't being focused exactly on the film plane, resulting in a slight softness.

Well done.


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6/26/2006 7:25:26 PM

 
Bob Chance
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/19/2006
  Okay! So you don't get the bonus points for having to look it up, but well done.
Simply put, chromatic aberration occurs because different colors actually focus at a different plane. On cheap lenses notably, if you have anything of the color red in your subject, upon close examination of the picture, you would notice fringing around the edges. This is because red, being of the lower wavelength isn't being focused exactly on the film plane, resulting in a slight softness.

Well done.


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6/26/2006 7:25:26 PM

 
Alan N. Marcus   A b&w developer has but five major ingredients. Name them.

What function does the yellow mask play in color negative film?

Why does equal amounts of cyan - magenta - yellow produce neutral denisity?

What function does gelatin play in the making of photo films and papers?

Why the series (number set) 1 - 1.4 - 2 - 2.8 - 4 - 5.6 - 8 - 11 - 22 - 32 ?
What is the significance of the 18% gray card?


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6/26/2006 10:35:54 PM

 
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