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Category: New Questions

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Photography Question 
JEEVAN 

member since: 10/11/2004
 

HOW TO PROTECT CAMERAS FROM FUNGAL ATTACK


HOW WOULD U PROTECT CAMERAS AND LENSES FROM FUNGAL ATTACK?
IS IT GOOD TO USE A DESSICANT MOISTURE MUNCHER?
ARE THERE ANYOTHER ACCESORIES TO PROTECT THE CAMERA AND LENS?
DO WE HAVE TO STORE CAMERA AND LENSES IN A WOODEN SHELF?

5/16/2006 8:18:56 PM

 
Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member

member since: 3/17/2005
  Welllllllll, to prevent fungus from among us, dessicant packs are always a good idea. You can buy them in the rechargable models of various sizes and they can be heated and dried out in an oven. (Their containers are aluminium with holes not the packets that come with vitamins or cameras.

And, store your lenses without filters. That's a big one, cause moisture can be trapped beneath them and contribute to a fungus growing environment. Also, never, NEVER, apply lens cleaner directly to the glass. Fluid can leak down the barrel adding to your moisture/growth problem.

Make sure the air circulates around your stored equipment whether it's on shelves, in bags, cases, etc. I don't store lenses in closed containers but rather flexible, breathable pouches and without caps or filters if the humidity is high.

High temp and high humidity can always be a problem. Using a de-humidifier in a room or closet where your gear is stored is very helpful. But when going from cool to hot-humid, I'd acclimate the equipment as I explain below.

Allowing equipment to acclimate to the environment you're going to store it in is a good idea. In other words, moving from very cold to a warm house, you should have your gear in plastic, zip-loc bags so that humidity will accumulate on the bag rather than the equipment.

The general rule for equipment storage is that if you're comfortable (with the temp and humidity) in the general area where your equipment is stored, then it should be fine. A wooden shelf? Hmmmmm. Never heard that one before. How's that supposed to work exactly? Wood absorbs moisture from beneath stored equipment??

BTW, you can get some cannisters of dessicant like material that absorb lots of moisture from enclosed spaces like closets or cabinets. They're used to keep clothes fresh, I guess and you can buy them at bed and bath shops or department stores. If you keep your stuff in a case, they might be helpful.

Oh, and if your equipment gets wet, like from rain or snow, dry it as soon as you can with soft cloths. Don't use a heat source like a hair dryer unless you really know when to stop using it. They can get warm enough to dry lubricants inside the camera body or lens barrels.

Take it light Jeevan.
Mark

5/17/2006 3:22:04 PM

 

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