BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Aingeal M. Puirs
 

Travel Photography


I will be travelling to Ireland again later this month. This time I am going on a tour using a coach.

Since we will be driving some of the time and I am sure I will see some landscapes I'd like to shoot but can't stop the bus to do so. What would be a good setting to use?

I have a polarizing filter. Woudl that be good to use to shoot through a bus window? What about flash?


To love this question, log in above
4/1/2006 12:15:37 PM

 
Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/17/2005
  My guess is that the coach driver will probably be stopping along the route for photo ops. Assuming that happens, just line your feet up with the prior tripod divots and blast away.

As far as shooting from a moving vehicle, ideally you should open the window and avoid the polarizer. You'll be moving and likely won't have time to properly set it before you lose the opportunity to photograph what you saw. A mild, mid-range telephoto or zoom would be helpful, something in the 135 to 250mm range might be nice, although to really hold a 250 steady by hand, you should up your shutter speed to about 1/200 or 1/250 of a sec.

If you can't open the window, make sure you've got a rubber lens hood with you. Put that flat against the window while supporting the camera firmly to prevent it from shifting if you hit a bump.

Except as I already mentioned, shutter speeds can stop motion at 1/60th or greater. 125 should do fine but it depends on the size of the lens you're using. Raise the camera a bit to avoid showing blurred road in the foreground. Meter periodically so you're set if you see something worthwhile to photograph.

As far as any other filters, you could use an 81B or even an 81C warming filter to give your colors a bit more saturation, assuming you're shooting with film. As for what kind of film, assuming you're shooting color negative, Fuji Superia is nice stuff, good with greens and reds. Fine grain, good working ISO and forgiving with exposure mistakes.

If you're shooting digitally, sorry...can't help ya.

Flash? No. What you'll see in the final image is what we call a fireball and little if any image beyond that. The flash will reflect off the window. Besides, do you think perhaps your flash has enough horsepower to say illuminate a castle 1/4 mile or more away from where you're riding? Probably not. Nope. Don't use a flash unless you're photographing your fellow travelers on the coach or lifting a few a the local pub.

Take it light.
Mark


To love this comment, log in above
4/2/2006 5:37:12 PM

 
Aingeal M. Puirs   I'll be using my digital Kodak DX7630 on the trip.


To love this comment, log in above
4/2/2006 5:47:42 PM

 
Aingeal M. Puirs   I could have sworn that I read somewhere that using a polarizing filter is good for reducing glare or reflection in windows.

I'm not sure if the windows on the bus opens or not.


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2006 6:17:19 AM

 
doug Nelson   I'm afraid you'll drive yourself crazy trying to do photography from a moving bus. By all means, try it; you may luck out on a few. Fast shutter, and infinity focus situations should work most of the time. I took such a bus trip in Italy, and drove my blood pressure up several points with the frustration of being confined to a bus. Work off the frustration by doing all you can when the bus lets you off.


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2006 7:25:44 AM

 
Aingeal M. Puirs   I know I will but I also know that invariably we will pass something I'd like to get a shot of.

I actually got a few good ones from our moving car the last time we were in Ireland. I believe I let the digital on auto mode and just fired away. But I had the windows down.

Did your bus have windows that you could open?


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2006 8:10:58 AM

 
Mark Feldstein
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/17/2005
  As I said, "If you can't open the window, make sure you've got a rubber lens hood with you. Put that flat against the window while supporting the camera firmly to prevent it from shifting if you hit a bump. "

Forget the polarizer. In this situation, it's pretty much useless.
M/


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2006 12:55:11 PM

 
Aingeal M. Puirs   Thanks.


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2006 1:04:57 PM

 
Log in to respond or ask your own question.