BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Eileen Lee Lavergne
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/16/2005
 

Buying a new camera


Hi. Can someone advise me if I'm better off at a higher-end digital camera or an SLR? I was using an SLR Nikon F50 for several years (since 1998) until it broke down on me recently. Was very happy with it while it lasted though. I have thought about repairing it but as all technology goes, it's probably more value for money to buy a new one. My dilemma is that I received a small digital compact Sony Cybershot DSC W12 almost a year ago and have discovered the pleasures of shooting digital images (plus the camera is really a dream). My only gripe is that the compact digital has zoom lens limitations and general lens manipulation and being so light and compact, my hands are not stable enough to ensure blur-free photos. I've also been told that nothing beats the accuracy and resolution of film for print. So, I would appreciate some views taking in mind that my budget is reasonably tight.


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8/25/2005 10:32:54 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   Film vs digital. Here we go again! LOL

Seriously, the question is whether to pay now or pay later. If you buy a digital SLR, you will pay a lot more now but pay nothing for film and less for processing. If you buy a film SLR, you will pay a lot less now but will have to pay for film and a little more for processing.

If you want a debate on the merits of film vs digital, do a Q&A search. You will find plenty of debates, some more rancorous than others.


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8/25/2005 10:44:00 AM

 
Eileen Lee Lavergne
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/16/2005
  Thanks Kelly for the tip on searching old Q&A. Sure didn't think of that silly me.

DSLRs aside, anyone got ideas for a right old-fashion SLR in the mid-range? I have a tamron 200mm lens that fit my old Nikon F50 which I'd like to be able to re-use.


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8/25/2005 11:20:10 AM

 
Will Turner   "anyone got ideas for a right old-fashion SLR in the mid-range"

If you mean by that, something relatively well-built that stands a good chance of lasting a few years:

Nikon FE2, FM2n (manual focus)
Nikon F801s(8008s), F90X(N90s) (autofocus)


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8/25/2005 11:35:52 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   I second Will's post. I don't think you could go wrong with any of those choices.


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8/25/2005 12:34:21 PM

 
Eileen Lee Lavergne
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/16/2005
  Thanks. I'm going to look it up.


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8/26/2005 10:32:08 AM

 
John Sandstedt
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/8/2001
  Used:

Minolta X-700 [semi-automatic]
Minolta Maxxum 7 [auto-exposure, auto-focus]

Canon AE-1 [semi-automatic]
Canon A1 [expensive originally, but lower prices as older camera] (semi-automatic
Canon EOS 620, 630, 650 [auto-focus, auto-exposure]

Pentax K-1000 [if you can find one (a real workhorse)]

Of course, you should consider the Nikon N-50, N-60, N-80, etc. since it would appear you have at least one Nikon lens.


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9/13/2005 1:20:49 PM

 
Philip Pankov
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/30/2004
philpankov.com
  Please do consider getting medium format camera - they are very cheap now as all pros are going digital.

Regards,
Philip Pankov
Pictures of Ireland - Fine Art Photographs of Ireland


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9/24/2005 7:55:37 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
cammphoto.com
  I too can vouch for the older Nikons for their solidly built construction, and the line of great manual-focus AI Nikkors still around. They rank among the sharpest lenses in their price range.

Philip,
...Just curious,...how much would it cost me to be able to get high-quality MF transparencies scans at home?
I've toyed with the idea of getting a medium-format Hassy for years but I only have a 35 mm scanner.
(BTW, I love your B&W photos.)

Bob


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9/24/2005 10:55:35 PM

 
Philip Pankov
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/30/2004
philpankov.com
  Hi Bob,

I ended up buying Nikon Coolscan 9000 scanner this summer to scan my MF films. Great investment but at a price of 2000 USD. I still feel itís worth it as it effectively gives me an equivalent of 50-70 mega pixels of resolution from 6x9 negs. I feel it makes sense for me to stay with film for a long while. I am sure others will disagree.

Regards,

Philip Pankov
Pictures of Ireland - Fine Art Black & White Photography of Ireland


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9/25/2005 4:19:13 PM

 
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