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Photography Question 
Connie J. Turner
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/22/2004
 

Aperture settings.


I'm really confused!!! On the manual setting, I usually set my f-stop on about 5.6. Is this the same thing as the aperture? What do the numbers mean on the ring closest to the body of the camera. The book I am reading says that this is the aperture numbers. If so then what happens when you zoom in? Does it change your aperture and what happens when you change the f-stop (ex. 5.6. I just don't understand the difference between the f-stop, aperture and zoom and the numbers on the lense closest to the body of the camera. I would really appreciate some feedback!!!!!!!


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7/25/2005 7:36:32 PM

 
Kitty  Cross   Connie

The aperture is the F-stop as indicated in your book. If you can take the lens off, look through the back of it and change the aperture from F22 to F4.5 or F2.8 or whatever the camera has. You'll see the iris go from the smallest opening(f22--not a lot of light gets to the film) to the largest(all the light possible gets to the film).

This is directly tied to the shutter speed--the amount of time the shutter is open. Read on in your book. You'll see that choosing the f stop and speed have to do with depth of field amongst other things. If you choose f 5.6, on a bright summer day your shutter speed will need to be fairly fast to prevent overexposing the image. On a cloudy day or in a shaded day, the shutter speed might be much slower. The light meter in your camera should be able to tell you what works.

Hope this helps
cheers!
Kit


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7/25/2005 7:53:03 PM

 
Connie J. Turner
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/22/2004
  Thank you Kitty, But I understand that part but what I don't understand is the book says that the numbers on the lens closest to the body of the camera are my aperture numbers? How is that if I can change them with the dial on the top of the camera?


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7/25/2005 8:11:50 PM

 
Kitty  Cross   Connie

The numbers on your lens closest to the body of the camera are indeed the aperture numbers. You change them with the dial on the lens.

The dial on the top of your camera changes the shutter speed. It'll be marked something like 1,2,4,8,15,30,60,125,250,500,800,1000, etc etc depending on the camera. This refers to the amount of time you leave the shutter open. More time--more light hits the film. Sorry--I just realized my earlier answer was a bit unclear.

Incidently, if you're not able to move that dial (the f-stop) it may have a macro function and the lens may be 'locked' in macro. It'll be labled macro and there should be a small red button somewhere about on the lens to release it so you can change the aperture.


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7/25/2005 8:49:54 PM

 
Connie J. Turner
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/22/2004
  Well, I can change the aperture with the dial on the top of the camera because I can see the numbers changing and I do understand the difference in between changing the shutter speed and f-stop. I've been setting my f-stop like this for a while because I never knew what the numbers meant on the lens. Also the numbers on the lens go from I think 18 to something else. But there is no points involved, (e 4.5) My camera is downstairs, and the f-stop I set on the top goes from 4.0 to 12.3 or something. If they are both f-stops then why don't they have the same numbers?
I guess what I am trying to figure out is, when I set the f-stop on the top where it show my choice though the view finder, when I zoom out using the lense,does it change the f-stop I set using the dial?
I'm really confused.


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7/25/2005 9:03:18 PM

 
Kitty  Cross   Connie--now you have me a little confused. What kind of a camera is it? I was assuming it was manual but your description is not like anything I know.

Zooming out won't change the f-stop. It'll change the focal length of the lens and consequently the width. For example if your zoom is say--70-200mm, 70 will be as wide as you can go allowing the maximum amount of light the lens will pass to the film and 200 will bring you closer, need more light and decrease the angle of view.

I have a Tamron 28-200mm lens in my hand right now. The numbers closest to the body on the lens are the f-stop, the second set of numbers are the focal lengths I can zoom in to.

I know absolutely nothing about digital cameras or medium format or rangefinders or twin lens reflex. If its one of those, I can't help--sorry.


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7/25/2005 9:20:55 PM

 
Connie J. Turner
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/22/2004
  You just answered my question!!!! The numbers are the focal lenth. That makes sense!!! Why didn't I see that? I think the book confused me! Thank you so much for being so patient and helping me work through this. The puzzle is solved!!! Thank you, Now that I understand that it seems silly that I didn't know!!!


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7/25/2005 9:31:55 PM

 
Kitty  Cross   Glad I could help Connie. What kind of a camera are you using?


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7/25/2005 9:38:02 PM

 
Connie J. Turner
BetterPhoto Member Since: 8/22/2004
  I just bought it but its a cannon, eso Digital rebel xt, 350d. Have you heard anything good or bad about these?


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7/25/2005 9:43:12 PM

 
Kitty  Cross   Sorry I can't help. I shoot with old manual Nikons (FM2, FE etc.)Sounds pretty though. Bet it can fry eggs and everything!(grin)


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7/25/2005 10:28:44 PM

 
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