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Photography Question 
Kaushik Biswas
 

Circular Polarizer Filter Troubleshooting


I have Nikon N75 and have been using a Circular Polarizer filter for the last couple of months. However, images particularly those taken indoor appear darker and "not that bright". Outside photos (not all) also does not appear as bright as it should appear. Can you help me with this ?
Kaushik


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7/12/2005 3:32:00 PM

 
Brendan Knell
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/17/2005
  Ok, a polarizer is like putting on sunglasses. It will block out reflections. So first, try rotating the polarizer. Then you should use a slower shutter speed. If it is just certian places on that photo, use a flash.


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7/12/2005 5:37:09 PM

 
Brian A. Wolter
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/15/2005
  Why would you be using a polarizer filter indoors? That is why the pictures are coming out dark. I only use my polarizer filter outdoors.


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7/13/2005 6:59:22 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   Kaushik, you really don't need to use a polarizer indoors. However, if you are using a camera with a TTL meter, the polarizer should not be affecting your exposure, except to darken the sky. It should not make the photos underexposed. Can you upload a couple of examples for us to look at?


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7/13/2005 8:56:20 AM

 
Kaushik Biswas  
 
 
Hi Kerry I am uploading some photos to illustrate the problem. My Nikon N75 has a TTL metered flash


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7/15/2005 11:43:13 AM

 
Kaushik Biswas  
 
 
Hi Kerry I am uploading some photos to illustrate the problem. My Nikon N75 has a TTL metered flash


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7/15/2005 11:44:10 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   I don't think your polarizer has anything to do with the exposure. for the two outside shots, the polarizer had no effect. Either the sun was in the wrong location or you didn't rotate your polarizer to get the best effect. They exposure is a little dark because your meter is taking in too much of the light of the sky, making the subject underexposed. Point your camera toward the grass to get your reading, lock it in and then recompose the picture. That way you will get the exposure reading off the darker part of the scene. For the first indoor shot, I really can't tell much. For the second one, your camera is reading the flash exposure off the foreground and the TTL mechanism is turning the flash off before it can put enough light on the subject in the background. Tilt your flash up a little (not too far) and the flash should be dispersed a little further before the camera shuts off the flash. Good luck.


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7/15/2005 1:11:43 PM

 
Brian    It sounds as though your camera meter may be thrown by it. My solution would be take a meter reading with a hand-held meter. Once you have your meter reading do a bracket exposure of opening up your lens by one to two stops. For example if your hand held meter says f 11 @ 250 I would then try f8 @250 and then f5.6 @ 250. Alternatively I would recommend using your TTL meter with the filter on and then follow the same procedure as above. By doing this you will get a feel how to compensate your exposure.


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7/18/2005 11:42:55 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   Brian, thank you for your response. My comment made it sound like I was saying he should not use the polarizer, which is not what I meant. By all means, use the polarizer and rotate it until you get the desired effect, but meter off the ground, not the sky.


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7/18/2005 2:16:00 PM

 
Kaushik Biswas   Thanks Kerry and Brian both of you for your immediate help. I have already clicked some pictures accordingly. Once I find the results I will be more than happy to contact you. Thanks again.


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7/19/2005 7:24:46 AM

 
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