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Photography Question 
Liza M. Franco
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/26/2004
 

Developing and Printing 120 film


I have a 1961 Rollei that my father-in-law gave me that is in beautiful condition. When given to me it had only had 5 rolls of film ever shot with it. I've done 2 now, but for someone who is a novice with this camera, developing and printing can get expensive. A friend of mine uses 120 and gets his stuff printed through Wal-Mart's send out service. I tried, and after 2 weeks of waiting for them to come back was told that they don't develop that type of film.

Has anyone else used their service for this type of film? I realize there are so many versions of each film size, so maybe that's why I had a problem. Just curious to know if anyone else has had good luck with this. Until I get better with this camera I really don't want to waste money on blurry photos. Its amazing how attached I am to auto focus and how bad I am when having to rely on manual focus.

Thanks,
Liza


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7/9/2005 7:22:33 PM

 
Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/14/2005
  I would find a pro lab that has more experience with medium format. I don't think you'll find any of the drug store or grocery store labs that can process 120 film. If you want to save some money, ask them if they can do proof sheets of the negatives, instead of prints. That might be cheaper. Then you can just print the ones you like.


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7/10/2005 7:35:01 AM

 
Liza M. Franco
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/26/2004
  I was surprised to hear that Wal-Mart did medium format. Its not something that they advertise but my friend does his there all the time and it is really cheap. Of course better quality would be obtained from a pro lab. I just thought it would be a good place to start until I'm more proficient. I've been told that they are very good portrait cameras. I just always thought they were really neat looking. The whole backwards thing is hard for me to grasp. I picked up two more at an estate sale about a year ago. A Yashica-Mat and a Rollei Gray Baby, the tiny one. Both seem to be in good working order. I still can't believe I paid $15.00 for both. If anyone has any helpful hints for using these I would really appreciate the help.

A proof sheet sounds like a good idea. thanks Chris.


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7/10/2005 8:44:11 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   I am surprised to hear that Wal-Mart's send out lab wouldn't process your film. Most send-out labs do. Check around until you find one. Pro labs will be better but they are expensive.

You will get used to the reversed image thing. I used to shoot sports with a Rollei of that vintage when I was in High School. It just takes a little practice. BTW, the B&W shot of the church in my gallery was shot with a 60's era Rollei (despite what the caption says). That old Rollei has one of the finest lenses ever made on it. About the only thing I can say that the camera is not good for is close-up shots. After all, you are looking through one lens and taking through another. The Yachica-Mat is also a good camera, although not in the league of the Rollei (I have one but don't use it anymore.) The Baby Rollei is also a good camera but you may have a hard time finding film for it. One good thing about a TLR with a WL viewfinder is that you can take pictures without people knowing you are taking them. Keeps people from posing for the picture so you get more natural shots. Also, the shutter is extremely quiet.


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7/11/2005 8:03:27 AM

 
Liza M. Franco
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/26/2004
  Kerry, I have one more camera that I didn't mention before. This one has interesting history. My grandfather took photos in two clubs in NY back in the 40's, The Stork and The Morrocan (?) I've got his personal album that is loaded with all the celebrities of the time. What a glamorous time period. I have his original Rollei that he used and I've been able to figure out by the numbers on it that it was from the late 30's. I took it to a camera store and found out the the taking lens is fogged or hazed over and there is a problem with the shutter. My grandfather lead a really exciting life and was published in Look, Life, and Vogue. (My dream, wish I had those kind of credits) He died at age 39 so it was a short-lived adventurous life. His camera is really special to me so it now just stays neatly packed away. Interesting side note, while looking up the flash gun that was with the camera, all I kept finding was Star Wars websites. Turns out that particular kind of flash gun is what they used to make the original light sabers in Star Wars. They go for about $300 to those diehard fans who want to make their own.


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7/11/2005 9:01:46 AM

 
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