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Photography Question 
Tonya R. Boles
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/7/2004
 

Help with an older camera


A firend just loaned me his older model film camera. the Pentax K1000, and I have no clue how to use it.. Can someone give me some tips on how to get started, or a place to read up on this camera. It has 200mm lens with it(Auto 2x Teleconverter) Help...:)


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6/29/2005 10:06:55 AM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  Download the manual from The split-image or micro-prism focus aid in the center of the viewfinder is most effective with large aperture lenses like f/1.4 to f/2.8. If the maximum aperture of the lens is f/4 or f/5.6 then those aids will tend to be too dark to use and you'll need to focus on the image outside the center circle.


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6/29/2005 10:48:21 AM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  D'oh! I jazzed up the link.
Download the manual from http://www.pentaximaging.com/customer_care/manuals_literature.
The K1000 is a very simple, dependable manual SLR. Exposure is set manually, adjusting the shutter speed and lens aperture until the meter needle is centered ("match-needle" metering). All functions are mechanical, the battery powers the meter only. The camera will work without a battery.


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6/29/2005 10:53:57 AM

 
Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/14/2005
  Just the basics: Turn the dial on top to select your shutter speed. Turn the aperture ring at the base of the lens (where it meets the camera body) to select your aperture. The needle on the right side of the viewfinder moves up and down to indicate overexposure or underexposure.

Almost forgot - make sure the film ASA speed is set correctly. This camera was made before there was DX coding for autosetting of film speed. You pull up on the shutter speed dial and rotate it until the correct speed shows in the little window.

You might want to take the 2x teleconverter off and just work with the lens until you get used to the manual focus. As Jon indicated, the teleconverter can make your viewfinder a bit dark.

Have fun!


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6/29/2005 10:57:17 AM

 
Sherry Arnold
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/21/2005
 
 
 
I am new to this forum and photography with an older type camera! lol

I have a Yashica FX3 with the 50MM lens.
Does the above advice work for this camera as well?? It also has the light meter. What is posted above seems so simple as to all that I have been reading here!

So if the light meter is green without the + or - that means the pic will turn out decent??

I realize this question was asked in June of 2005 and it is now October but figured I'd ask anyway!

Thanks


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10/21/2005 1:19:50 PM

 
Sherry Arnold
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/21/2005
  I am new to this forum and photography with an older type camera! lol

I have a Yashica FX3 with the 50MM lens.
Does the above advice work for this camera as well?? It also has the light meter. What is posted above seems so simple as to all that I have been reading here!

So if the light meter is green without the + or - that means the pic will turn out decent??

I realize this question was asked in June of 2005 and it is now October but figured I'd ask anyway!

Thanks


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10/21/2005 1:24:52 PM

 
Kerry L. Walker   Without going into a litany of the variables that can affect exposure (like back lighting, etc.) the short answer is - yes.


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10/21/2005 1:55:29 PM

 
Jon Close
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/18/2000
  Sherry, if you don't have the instruction manual for the Yashica, you can read it http://www.butkus.org/chinon/. The link has instruction manuals for many older "orphan" cameras from Chinon, Yashica, Ricoh, etc.


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10/21/2005 2:42:31 PM

 
Sherry Arnold
BetterPhoto Member Since: 10/21/2005
  Hi folks! Thanks for your responses and sorry for the double post! I don't know what I did there!!

John, thanks for the link - I found it earlier today. I know working this camera is going to take alot of trial and error so hopefully I won't have too many questions. I've been on this site reading all day!
Basically, I'm not looking to do anything fancy(not for years anyway), I just like how these cameras produce super clear and life-like images. I take pictures mostly of my dogs and cats. I've only ever operated an automatic camera, but I just want something a little better! That is if I can learn to work the darn thing!!


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10/21/2005 4:34:15 PM

 
Will Turner   Well, it's a standard 60/40 center-weighted reflected light meter. It can be fooled by tricky light conditions that do not correspond to 18% grey subject. Your best bet in addition to the manual is practice. Successfully metering things like sunsets, snow-covered fields in full sun, etc. and recording your exposure information will teach you more quickly.

The Yashica meter reads more than just +, - and green, btw. A slight overexposure is + with green, slight underexposure is - with green. Some print films you may try might do better with slight overexposure, some slide film with slight underexposure.


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10/25/2005 3:21:44 PM

 
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