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Photography Question 
Sherrye Nozaki
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/26/2004
 

Epson R2400 Printer


Has anyone got the new Epson R2400 yet and if so how do you like it? I am particularly interested in how close the colors come out to your monitor? I have not bought a color management system yet and hope I don't have to if the Epson R2400 prints pretty close to my monitor. I had a very bad experience with the Epson 1280 as the colors never printed what I saw on my montitor. Thanks.


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6/20/2005 12:14:18 AM

 
Ron  Hiner   Sherrye, Sherrye, Sherrye... the Epson R2400 is a printer for serious photographers... And I see by your work that you are indeed a serious photographer. The Epson R2400 is priced north of $800+ .. It's my humble opinion that you will get far better results from $500 printer and a $300 color management device than you will get from an $800 dollar printer. Serious photographers should really really be using color management -- and outsource your printing if you want, but don't buy the Epson r2400 until AFTER you get your monitor calibrated.


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6/27/2005 9:17:56 AM

 
Sherrye Nozaki
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/26/2004
  Ron, Ron, Ron...I am serious about this. I just got the Eye-One Display 2:) I have no intentions of sending my prints out and am even looking at the Epson 4800. I really want to know the pros and cons of the R2400, not just color management. I'm sorry I wasn't clear about that in my first message. I have been looking at all the postings on dpreview and there are a lot of different opinions. Thanks, Sherrye


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6/27/2005 12:17:09 PM

 
David Earls   Sherrye, Sherrye, Sherrye,

Ron is right, right, right. You never got acceptable output from your Epson 1280 out of the box because you never color-managed your workflow.

Calibrating your monitor is a start, but it won't affect your printed output in any way. It won't affect Epson 2400 printed output any more than it will affect Epson 1280 output. Your printer doesn't know or care about what you see on the monitor.

Your captured images indicate you are serious about the capture part of this. Now you have to get serious about the other part - the output part, and that means color management.

That means shooting in camera RAW because you can calibrate your RAW image processor for YOUR camera - not your camera model, but YOUR specific camera. It means calibrating your monitor monthly. And it means printing through good ICC profiles.

Also, understand that inkjet output will never look like lab output. It's a completely different process. You have to learn to capture images for inkjet output, and take advantage of the advantages inkjet offers over lab - which means sacrificing the advantages lab offers over inkjet.

The big downside, from what I've read so far, is the high cost of 2400 output (eight inks, Epson carts only). One set of 2400 carts is going for $120 vs about $65 for Epson 2200 carts (seven inks). Epson doesn't offer any bulk ink systems, and the MediaStreet bulk ink system I bought for my 2200 clogged within a year. If you're not going to get serious about color management, then you're going to be limited to Epson media, which is great media, and the Epson free profiles, which work great. But, it's expensive media.


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6/27/2005 9:03:56 PM

 
Sherrye Nozaki
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/26/2004
  Thanks thanks thanks David for your input. I do have a lot to learn about color management and In accept that and will do some reading. However, in the end I don't want to spend more time printing than shooting, but I do want great results. Practice, practice, practice!!! Aloha, Sherrye


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6/27/2005 11:47:50 PM

 
David Earls   Sherrye,

The point of learning about color management is that then you don't have to spend your time (and energy) getting output that doesn't meet your expectations.

Read anything at all by Bruce Fraser. When it comes to color management, he is "The Man".

Good luck with it. It's not easy and it's not fun, until that distant day when output is coming off your printer and you have the fleeting realization that it's been a long time since you were hassled by output problems -


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6/28/2005 5:17:04 AM

 
Tom Sperduto   Sherrye - The Epson 1280 is one of the greatest ink jet printers ever made IMO. Matter of fact, people are still buying them and using them even after all the others have come out. Also, you'll notice it hasn't dropped in price in years. Before you break the bank you may want to try to get all you can out of the 1280.
My guess is, you will have the same problems with the 2400 because you need to understand color management and also know how to set the printer. Recently I have been using Kodak professional Paper and their website has great instructions for setting the ICC profile. With my 1280, what's on my screen, is what's on my print ... or close. I am also using Monaco EZColor.
Tom
www.tomsperduto.com


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6/29/2005 7:59:04 AM

 
Sherrye Nozaki
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/26/2004
  Hi Tom and thanks for your response. However, I just sold my 1280 and am very glad I did. The biggest problem I had with the 1280 was fading. Horrible horrible fading. I submitted a photo for a contest that was on a different island than I am and by the time I got it back, it had already started to fade. I was horrified as I won first place in the contest and was so sad I couldn't frame the winning entry. I did print another one, but it just wasn't the same. (Entry rules were no framed under glass entries). So, not only do I have color issues, I have fading issues. I also have a small 5550 HP printer, and have prints up on the wall for years and no fading even though it is not archival ink. Go figure! So before I sink $800+ into another printer, I want to make darn sure it's something that will suit all my needs. Aloha!


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6/29/2005 9:46:53 PM

 
Sherrye Nozaki
BetterPhoto Member Since: 5/26/2004
  One more thing, I do sell my photos and therefore I am looking at the Epson 2400 as when I send my photos to the mainland I want them to be as "archival" as possible. Of course, I understand there are two papers with the new HP 130/90 that are somewhat archival with the new HP ink and I could spray my photos with acrylic preservative, but I like to keep things simple. Plus, the Epson 2400 is water resistant and HP is not.


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6/29/2005 9:50:30 PM

 
Terry  R. Hatfield
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/4/2003
  My 1280 Is Spot On No Variations In Color At All Calibrating The Monitor And Printer Up Front Would Have Saved You A Bundle, Im Not Up To Speed On The Newer 2400 Im Sure Its a Great Printer But The 1280 Is Hard To Beat In Its Price Range..I Have Old Prints That Still Look The Same Im Not Sure What Would Be Your Problem With The Fading?


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6/30/2005 9:19:14 AM

 
Marcia L. Getto
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/22/2004
  Hi Sherrye --
It's now 4 months later, and I'd like to know how you like your R2400. I just purchased one and I'm still in the experimenting stage. In some cases, I like the prints from my old HP 7350 better. I haven't tried color calibration yet. I'll follow David E's advice above, and read anything by Bruce Fraser on the subject. Any comments or advice you have would be greatly appreciated!


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12/6/2005 5:45:08 AM

 
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