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Photography Question 
Fleur Guibovich
 

How to achieve effective panning?


I am currently undertaking a photography course using a Minolta SLR camera. we have started with black and white photography. One of my recent assignments is "panning photography". I feel so frustrated as I do not seem to get the background motion. I have already spent 5 films and my photos are sharper than eve! I set up my camera in F/22, 1/60 and used Ilford FP4 film (125) I have used the technique of following my subject and shooting whilst still following the subject without the stopping. IS THERE ANY SECRET TO GET A BLURRED BACKGROUND? I am desperate, as my assignment is due this coming Friday.

Looking forward to hear your suggestions!

Fleur Guibovich
Sydney Australia


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4/24/2005 6:03:01 PM

 
Bob Cammarata
BetterPhoto Member Since: 7/17/2003
  Your shutter speed needs to be relative to the subject matter you are panning.

For example:...A guy walking down the street would require a slower shutter speed for panning than a car speeding by on the freeway.

I've played around with this technique a few times and have found that at least 2 shutter speeds slower than required to freeze a moving subject, is needed for a successful pan. It's all dependant upon the available light and the speed of your subject.

For example:...If you can freeze a bicycler racing down a hillside at 1/250 second,...then 1/60 or 1/30 sec. would create a pleasing blur of the background when you pan with the motion.
If the same cyclist was just cruising along on level terrain, you would need to go slower,...maybe 1/8 or 1/4 sec. to achieve the same effect.



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4/24/2005 6:31:22 PM

 
Bob Cournoyer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/9/2003
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  And I'm thinking f/22 is a bit much. You want your subject to be in focus, but not the background/foreground. Maybe try f/8 - f/11 when panning which would add to the back/fore blur. And the slower shutter speeds like Bob said.

Another Bob


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4/24/2005 7:54:15 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Panning background blur isn't dependent on f stop, so f/22 isn't going to matter. Just needs to shoot something that's moving faster. Or use 100 speed film instead of 400.


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4/24/2005 10:49:26 PM

 
Fleur Guibovich   Thanks for replying my query. I was taking photos of kids racing on a scooter, and they were not racing on a high speed indeed; and was also taking photos of football (soccer)players during a match, where they run and stop. I was using for all 1/60 and 1/30 sec. perhaps that is why I did not get the motion, will try different slower speeds.
I was also using a slow film FP4/125.


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4/25/2005 2:46:51 AM

 
Bob Cournoyer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/9/2003
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  My partially educated mind thot that a shorter depth o' field would help if he/she was having problems blurring background.
Bob


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4/25/2005 7:51:31 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  You using a short focal length lens with far off background? As well as subject distance?
Shoot some traffic from right on the sidewalk.


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4/25/2005 2:29:43 PM

 
Noor H.   Hello guys,
my question is, how can I freeze the subjet if it was moving fast, wouldnt it be hard to focuse on it?


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4/26/2005 3:22:14 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  still pan with it. you can spot focus where it will be and shoot when it gets there. or you follow focus and shoot as you get it in focus.


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4/26/2005 7:06:38 AM

 
Samuel Smith
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/21/2004
  panning,
here's what i've been doing.
i have a minolta xtsi,35 mm,and use the sports program mode,auto,to pan.it focuses as you pan in milli-seconds with the shutter pressed part way down.neat huh?anyway I shot a couple of r/c aircraft fly-ins last year,with great success.i used 400 speed film because it gave me faster shutter speeds even in good light.most were shot at or near 300mm.for safety can't go on the field,ok with me.
mostly the camera set the aperature at 5.6 to around 8.forgot to record the shutter speed.
the real trick was learning the fluid motion it takes to follow the subject,and not cram the shutter button the rest of the way down.a few of the shots are in my gallery.don't get me wrong,1 in 5 still come out a little fuzzy. hth,sam


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4/26/2005 4:09:50 PM

 
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