BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Ann E. Tate
 

Animal Pictures: How to Photograph in Low Light


 
 
How can I get sharp images of lions at dusk without flash reflection from eyes? I changed ISO to 400, too grainy. I shot with a Canon Eos 10D, 100 - 400mm zoom, image stabilized, and monopod.


To love this question, log in above
4/3/2005 8:10:45 AM

 
Peter K. Burian
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/8/2004
  Ann: This is one of those situations where there is no solution, other than a high ISO setting. Or using flash, and then correcting the eyes in Photoshop. That's easy for red-eye in Elements 3.0 and Photoshop CS, but green eye is more common in animals. Perhaps someone can offer a Photoshop tip for easily solving that problem.
Peter Burian
www.peterkburian.com


To love this comment, log in above
4/3/2005 8:36:59 AM

 
Ann E. Tate  
 
 
Peter,
Thanks for your response. It's difficult to know how animals will respond to flash in the wild, depending on circumstances. Most all of my lion sightings were at dusk - wonderful to experience, difficult to capture. I did correct one image in Photoshop 7.0, but eyes look dead now. Most of my images with eyes you can see reflections in the cornea - way cool.


To love this comment, log in above
4/3/2005 11:02:52 AM

 
Ann E. Tate  
 
  Lioness at Dusk, Botswana
Lioness at Dusk, Botswana
© Ann E. Tate
Canon EOS 10D Digi...
 
  Male lion awaits his Brothers, Chitabe Camp
Male lion awaits his Brothers, Chitabe Camp
© Ann E. Tate
Canon EOS 10D Digi...
 
 
Peter,

thanks for your response. Difficult to know how animals will respond to flash in the wild, depending on circumstances. Most all of my lion sitings were at dusk, wonderful to experience, difficult to capture. I did correct one image in Photoshop 7.0, but eyes look dead now. Most of my images with eyes you can see reflections in the cornea - way cool.


To love this comment, log in above
4/3/2005 11:03:50 AM

 
Noor H.   Hey ann,
nice pictures in ur gallery, did you use flash for all of them?
N


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2005 5:07:40 AM

 
Christopher A. Vedros
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/14/2005
  Gee, my most recent animal shot was a parrot at the zoo. I gotta get out more. ;-)

Nice images Ann. Be careful out there!


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2005 7:54:13 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   Green-eye in animals, like red-eye in humans, is caused by the flash being too close to the lens axis. Use a flash bracket and this problem should be eliminated. I'm with Chris. Beautiful shots but I need to get out more too.


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2005 8:08:04 AM

 
David Petry   Ann,

There is a simple method for red-eye or green-eye in Photoshop Elements 2.0.
1. Zoom in.
2. Select the lasso tool and draw around the the colored area of the pupil.
3. Select Feather from the Select menu and use the default radius of 5 pixels.
4. Open the Hue/Saturation tool from the EnhanceAdjust Color menu. In the Edit drop-down, select yellow or green, and then set both hue and saturation to -180. You may have to repeat this last step or try a different base color.

This nicely leaves the highlight in the pupil and avoids that dead look.

David


To love this comment, log in above
4/5/2005 10:22:53 PM

 
Log in to respond or ask your own question.