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Photography Question 
KIM M. FRANCOEUR
 

All I want is a picture of the MOON!


The Moon was full and the sky was clear...there I stood with my tripod and Canon EOS 20D.

Through the view finder and focused at infinity, it look GREAT! Nice and crisp, clear and focused...So what happened when I pressed the shutter?

A bright SPOT!

I tried TV and AV Mode, I tried a long exposure, short exposure,slow shutter, fast shutter,high ISO and low ISO...and even played with the exposure meter..(this helped alot but even decreased all the way to -1.2 it was still not sharp.

What can I do to get this shot?


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2/23/2005 7:09:06 PM

 
Ed Wenger
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/9/2004
  I went through this also. You have to use the manual mode on your camera and set it to the exposure chart on this website http://home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/howtophoto/
Experiment with different shutter speeds around what the chart tells you.


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2/24/2005 3:48:15 AM

 
Michael H. Cothran   The problem with shooting the moon is that you usually have this extremely bright spot in the middle of a black abyss - and this is a sure way for confusing your meter into over exposing. Getting a good exposure of the moon is one of the easiest things to do. Why? Because the brightness of the moon never changes. It is always lit by the sun, and that luminance value never changes. So once you know the luminance value, you no longer need to waste time metering.
Here's the rememdy - Turn off your meter. As I stated, the moon's brightness is very predictable, and so is its exposure. In fact, any variation in brightness is only caused by our own atmosphere, and that is very little. Since the moon is lit by the sun, you can use the Sunny 16 rule to expose the moon.
Simply put, you would use a shutter speed nearest your ISO (example - for ISO 100, use 1/125 sec) at an aperture of f11, f13.5, or f16. All will provide you with a good moon shot with lots of detail, but each will be a little different in brightness. Shoot all three exposures, then pick the one you like best.
Also, for the moon shots, use ISO 100 for the best in detail and sharpness.
If hand holding, you could use 1/250 sec @ f8, f9.5, and f11.
Try it. Just be sure to TURN OFF your meter. Remember, in predictable light, you don't need to meter if you are familiar with the luminance level of the scene.
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net


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2/24/2005 5:19:47 AM

 
Michael H. Cothran   Kim, One more thing.
FYI - Most of the great moon and earth shots you see in the media from NASA were shot with a meterless Hasselblad camera by non-photographers (astronauts with cameras strapped to their chests). How did they get such great exposures? The same rule that I gave you in the previous response. Since everything they saw (the moon and earth) was lit by the sun, they only needed to know ONE exposure value (which boils down to the Sunny 16 rule as it's called), and that's what they used (and still use) on all the shots ever taken out there.
Couldn't be simpler! (Once you know!)
Michael H. Cothran
www.mhcphoto.net


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2/24/2005 5:28:02 AM

 
KIM M. FRANCOEUR   WOW - Thanks so much for your input. I am still learning! I will try all your suggestions and the web site and see what happens. Too bad it snowed tonight and the moon is GONE! There is always next month!

THANKS AGAIN!!


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2/24/2005 4:32:15 PM

 
Susan Patton
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/1/2004
  Kim,
I can't quit laughing at your post...I just spend the last 30 minutes, tripod in hand, long exposure, short exposure, f/4.5, f/32, long lense, short lense. I got a fuzzy white blob or a bright spot!! I came in, tuned in to the web site and there was your post. Thanks for brightening my frustrating evening! And Michael thanks for solving the problem.


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2/24/2005 5:36:11 PM

 
KIM M. FRANCOEUR   Susan,

Did it work?

You must be somewhere where it is not snowing if you can see the Moon. Lucky!

I have to wait till the next full moon and clear sky to try all this great advice.

Congrats!


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2/24/2005 8:06:09 PM

 
Susan Patton
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/1/2004
  I do live where it doesn't snow..south Florida. However, I look at all the beautiful winter snow scenes and I wish I had a little bit of winter! I did not go back out last night but will try again tonight if the weather permits. I'll let you know if I have success.


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2/25/2005 9:23:37 AM

 
KIM M. FRANCOEUR   I love Florida.

Well, I checked the manual for my camera and there is no way (that I can see) to turn off the meter. So I am not sure what I am going to do there...

By the way, I love your gallery...I am embarrassed by ALL the galleries on this site. They are so good, and even though I am a begginer, I wonder if I will ever be that good!


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2/26/2005 1:56:12 PM

 
Susan Patton
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/1/2004
  Thanks for the compliment Kim, but I too am a beginner. I've been at it seriously for about four years now, but still have so much to learn. The classes on this site are worth every penny. If you haven't tried one I would highly recommend it. You get feedback from a pro as well as your class mates that is priceless.


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2/27/2005 6:04:11 AM

 
Susan Patton
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/1/2004
  Does your camera have a manual setting? If so that's where you would set your exposure per Michael's instructions.


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2/27/2005 6:08:00 AM

 
Tony Sweet
TonySweet.com
Tony's Photo Courses:
2-Week Short Course: A Quick Start to Adding More 'Pop' to Your Images
  To avoid the white spot moon, always photograph the moon at dusk, NOT with a black sky. Unless of course you're using a telescope.


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2/27/2005 1:43:04 PM

 
Mary L. Lemley  
 
 
I was going to suggest what Tony S. just did but wasn't sure until I saw his answer! Iv'e never uploaded it, but a picture I took at Gulf Shores in Sept (2 wks. before Hurricane
Frederick, yes that long!), a full moon was blazing down over a calm ocean, and it came out just as it actually looked. Manual ex. Keep trying the night shots with the moon through tree branches or leaves or even light clouds and you'll get some neat shots. Mary Lemley


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2/27/2005 9:56:58 PM

 
Mary L. Lemley  
 
 
I was going to suggest what Tony S. just did but wasn't sure until I saw his answer! Iv'e never uploaded it, but a picture I took at Gulf Shores in Sept (2 wks. before Hurricane
Frederick, yes that long!), a full moon was blazing down over a calm ocean, and it came out just as it actually looked. Manual ex. Keep trying the night shots with the moon through tree branches or leaves or even light clouds and you'll get some neat shots. Mary Lemley


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2/27/2005 9:58:02 PM

 
Kevin Burns   Simply put, shoot the moon during day light hours. When the sky is blue and the moon is out, the bright glow of the moon is not present during the day. But the moon is. Then simply remove the background or flood fill solid color black. I have yet to see a real picture of the moon shot at night. it is two bright of an object to focus on.
This the easyest way I found. There is other ways around the glowing of the moon at dark night but is rather complex and involved. A much better image is gotten from shooting the moon during day light and also importaint is during day light hours the moon is closer to earth meaning a larger capture.
Just my oppion.


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2/28/2005 7:21:25 AM

 
 
 
 
take it during the day


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2/28/2005 5:20:33 PM

 
 
 
 
take it during the day


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2/28/2005 5:21:06 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  haven't seen a real shot of the moon at night? It's not complex. The question's been answered several times before. You can put moon in the search box and read one the threads that come up.


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2/28/2005 6:52:29 PM

 

BetterPhoto Member
  As a starting point, with a shutter speed of 1/250 use the following aperatures
iso 25 f/5.6
iso 50 f/8
iso 100 f/11
iso 400 f/22
An eqiuvalent combination of shutter speeds will do.
Bracket in half stops


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3/1/2005 10:57:52 AM

 
Alicia A. Bruce   I've wondered the same thing! I can't wait for the snow to move out so I can eventually try it.


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3/1/2005 1:10:04 PM

 
KIM M. FRANCOEUR   Everyone has been so wonderful! I can not wait till the next full moon! With all this help...how can I miss???

Thanks to all, and again...your Galleries are so good, I want to cry!!

I hope one day I can be that good!

Kim


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3/1/2005 2:40:09 PM

 
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