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Browning Cha
 

The Twin- lens reflex


Question 1. The Chief advantage of the Twin-lens reflex camera is its.
-compact construction, light weight, and fast loading
-simplicity durability and quietness
-absence of parallax error
or -ability to accept different types of lens


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12/28/2004 3:52:41 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  Are you asking or telling?
In my opinion, the chief advantage of my TLR was its ability to sync at all speeds because the synchronization was between each lens, at least with the Mamiyaflex C-2.

My Mamiyaflex C2 was easy to load, had compact construction, but it was mostly metal, so not particularly light weight when compared with plastic.

However, my Canon Elan 7E is awesome. It's extremely easy to load, is also light weight, although a much more complex camera. I could work my Mamiyaflex blindfold, as long as I had the basics of photography in my brain. Whereas, it's going to take some time to get the basics of the Elan into my brain.

Yes, my Mamiyaflex C-2 TLR was simple, durable (lasting 50 years and counting) and relatively quiet, especially compared with the Elan. The shutter hardly made any noise at all.

But, alike the Elan, the Nikon, and many other SKRs, the lenses that it could accept had to be manufactured for that particular camera. And while, I had a 65 mm wide angle (2 1/4 square negative), 80 mm normal, 135 short telephoto, 180 mm telephoto, all lenses had to be made by Mamiya. Hence, one could not use a Rollei lens on a Mamiya body. And, this is the same as the SLR's today.

ALL TLRs, to my knowledge, had a parallex problem, as the upper lens would view the image and the lower lens would capture the image. Between the two lenses, one could snap off part of a person's head. Hence, I needed to fill the negative, but leave a little more for head room, just in case.

Therefore, I would say that the chief advantage of my TLR was its simplicity, durability, and quietness, and its ability to sync at all speeds once B or X was set. B signifies flash bulb, and X signifies electronic strobe or more accurately flash.


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12/29/2004 6:49:19 PM

 
Bunny Snow
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/16/2004
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  In my opinion, the chief advantage of my TLR was its ability to sync at all speeds because the synchronization was between each lens, at least with the Mamiyaflex C-2.

My Mamiyaflex C2 was easy to load, had compact construction, but it was mostly metal, so not particularly light weight when compared with plastic. On the other hand, because it was mostly metal, it will last as long as it receives care. Unfortunately, the repair people are no longer available for the cameras.

However, my Canon Elan 7E is awesome. It's extremely easy to load, is also light weight, although a much more complex camera. While I could work my Mamiyaflex blindfolded, as long as I had the basics of photography in my brain, it's going to take some time before I am able to put the Elan into my brain.

Yes, my Mamiyaflex C-2 TLR was simple and durable (lasting 50 years and counting). It was also relatively quiet, especially compared with the Canon. The shutter hardly made any noise at all.

But, alike the Elan, the Nikon, and many other SLRs, the lenses that the Mamiyaflex could accept had to be manufactured by Mamiya. And while, I had a 65 mm wide angle (2 1/4 inch square negative), 80 mm "normal", 135 mm short telephoto, 180 mm telephoto, all lenses had to be made by Mamiya.
Hence, one could not use a Rollei lens on a Mamiya body. And, this is the same as most SLR's today.

ALL TLRs, to my knowledge, had a parallax problem, as the upper lens would view the image and
the lower lens would capture. Between the two lenses, one could snip off part of a person's head or literally lose an important section of the image. Hence, I needed to fill the negative, but allow an extra couple inches head room, just in case.

Therefore, I would say that the chief advantage of my TLR was its simplicity, durability, and quietness, and its ability to sync at all speeds once B or X was set. B signifies flash bulb, and X signifies electronic strobe or electronic flash. But, remembering back, it was easy for the sync lever to
switch to the wrong side, and hence, I'd lose the picture.


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12/29/2004 7:17:40 PM

 
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