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Photography Question 
Ronggo Kusumo
 

How Do I Shoot a Fast-Moving Object?


 
 
Excuse me, if anyone knows how to shoot a fast-moving object, please kindly let me know. Many thanks in advance.


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8/1/2004 9:05:51 PM

 
Dave Cross   Hi Ronggo. Assuming that your "fast-moving object" is a car, aircraft etc., the secret is to "pan" the camera.
Get your object in the viewfinder well before the point at which you wish to take the photo, and follow it with the camera ... keeping it framed in the viewfinder.
Press the shutter at the point you want the picture. Continue panning after you hit the shutter to ensure that any shutter lag does not result in you losing the shot.

Panning does require some practice, particularly with a long zoom and a fast-moving object. A nice side effect of panning is that you can use a slower shutter speed than you might normally need to stop the motion this will give your background some movement blur giving a real impression of speed to the photo.

Hope this is of help. If your object is "something else," let us know.
Cheers
DC


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8/2/2004 1:17:34 AM

 
Diane Dupuis
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/27/2003
  Hi Dave, I have a question. Are you doing this on a tripod? Can you easily turn the camera on the tripod and follow the action until the right moment? Or are you hand-holding? I've tried a few times (with my son on his trick bike). It is quite difficult. Any other advice you may have on capturing the moment would be greatly appreciated!


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8/2/2004 3:36:01 PM

 
Dave Cross   Hi Diane
There is a definite "knack" to panning, and the only real solution is practice. If you have something that follows an irregular course (aircraft, trick bike, etc.) I try to handhold, for motor sport a tripod (or monopod) is more manageable.

If your camera has a "burst" or "action" mode that allows you to fire off several shots one after another, use it ... you are bound to get one where the subject is near the centre of the frame or, for that matter, in the frame, I have numerous shots of empty sky taken at aerobatic displays :(

Enjoy, and let's see some of your action shots.
Cheers
DC


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8/3/2004 4:15:41 AM

 
Diane Dupuis
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/27/2003
  Thanks, Dave,
I have been practicing, but really only handheld ... My tripod can't move that way, and I don't have a monopod. I do have some sample action shots/collages in my gallery if you want to check it out and let me know what you think. I certainly do love the burst mode on my S5000. It makes all the difference for me!


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8/3/2004 6:39:07 AM

 
Karma Wilson
BetterPhoto Member Since: 6/27/2004
  Diane,
I've been doing panning with the same camera. One thing that kills us is the somewhat slow autofocus. On the DSLRs the autofocus is almost instant. We have a lag. This results in blurry pictures as we rush to try and focus the subject. So, to avoid this get something the same distance you're son will be zooming by and pre-focus on that. Keep the shutter halfway depressed, have your son start pedalling, and start snapping as soon as he comes in the frame in burst mode. Don't use auto mode. It won't produce a good pan. And certainly don't use action. Set your camera on shutter priority, and try 1/30 or 1/60 and you should get a nice pan with a good blurry background and blurred wheels and feet from him pedaling.
I'll be submitting a pan of my kids running in the snow probably sometime next week.
Good luck!


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11/24/2004 6:59:29 AM

 
Diane Dupuis
BetterPhoto Member Since: 12/27/2003
  Thanks Karma! I'll try it one of these days!
DDK


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11/25/2004 6:09:49 PM

 
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