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Photography Question 
Taylor 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/25/2004
 

How to Shoot Photos of Castles


In two weeks, I am going to England and will be taking a lot of photos of castles. If you have any tips to make my photos better please tell me.


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7/28/2004 10:10:18 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Incorporate the relationship between the castle and the scenery.


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7/28/2004 10:49:40 PM

 
Dave Cross   Hi Taylor. Enjoy the UK :-)
Like Gregory says, make sure you incorporate the scenery and context of the castle: Get shots of the castle looming over the landscape, dominating the city, etc., etc.

Don't get too close ... castles are BIG.
Having just said 'don't get too close' I'll now contradict myself ;-) ... Get in close to capture the details, carvings, statues, etc. Look for unusual angles - maybe silhouettes or views out through barred windows etc.

Be creative and post some of your shots here when you return. Enjoy.
DC
P.S. Don't forget your umbrella - everything you've heard about our weather in the UK is true :-)


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7/29/2004 2:05:51 AM

 
doug Nelson   Be sure you have a wide-angle lens, at least a 35, maybe a 24 or 28. You'll be in some tight spaces and won't be able to back up. Frame your shots when you can. Sometimes the view of the countryside from inside the castle can be interesting, especially through a window or battlements. See the France gallery on my Web page for some castle shots. There's one in the Switzerland/Austria set. The best of the bunch was taken through an arch in Carcassone, France, with a 35mm lens on an $80 point and shoot.


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7/29/2004 5:55:00 AM

 
Taylor 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/25/2004
  Thank you, Gregory, Dave, and Doug. You all gave me great tips, and I will keep them in mind.


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7/29/2004 8:08:02 AM

 
Jef Franklin
BetterPhoto Member Since: 9/5/2003
  I would love to add a location to this great list of recomendations. The castle in Edinburgh will provide you with tons of photo ops. Also, don't forget your tripod.
Have a wonderfull time.


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8/3/2004 2:17:30 AM

 
Bill Boswell   I found a "near-far" photo with flowers or vegetation in the bottom foreground and the castle in the top background to be an excellent way to remove distracting elements such as people, entry lines, etc. Be sure to use a tripod and get down low so all that shows is the vegetation in a flower bed, for example, and the castle in the background. You will need maximum depth of field, of course.


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8/3/2004 5:26:32 AM

 
Gianna Stadelmyer
BetterPhoto Member Since: 2/7/2004
  I agree...a wide angle lens is a definite plus. Also, don't forget your tripod. Castles are dark inside and the tripod will help give you crisp clear pics of the interior. Try some interior shots both with flash and utilizing the natural light for atmosphere. As far as the exterior, if it is possible (aka - you are not with a tour group), try to get the exterior from a variety of angles: close-up and far away. Find a hill looking down on the castle and let a walkway or road lead your eye to it. This not only lets you get a great overall view of the whole building, but also avoids some of the distortion that can occur shooting a huge castle from the ground up. I am not an expert in the field by any means, but I have visited several castles while touring around Europe on our current post there and these are things that I have learned on my own that help:-) Enjoy your trip!


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8/3/2004 8:50:28 AM

 
Fred I. Clayton   If you are using a digital, take panoramas by using several overlapping shots, 25-50%. If camera has panaorama capability fine. If not, but you can operate camera manually, do so by using same settings for each shot. Elsewise, take pictures using automatic and then use computer software, i.e. Panorama Factory, to stitch shots together and if the exposures are not too far off, the software should make necessary adjustments. Just wait until each image has been written to your storage before taking the next shot, otherwise sometimes the shots will have too much difference in exposure.


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8/3/2004 10:37:18 AM

 
Taylor 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/25/2004
  Thank you Jef, Bill, Jan, and Fred. Once again you all have been very helpful to me. One of the castles I am going to is the Edinburgh castle so I am glad to hear that it is a good castle to see.


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8/3/2004 11:33:40 AM

 
Taylor 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/25/2004
  Thank you everyone who responded to my question. Tomorrow is the day that I will be leaving for England so I will keep in mind everything you told me.


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8/10/2004 9:47:55 PM

 
Taylor 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 4/25/2004
  Hi everyone, I am back. I was just hoping that I could have some feedback on some of my photos. Here are some that I took while on my trip to Europe.

http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?cat=&photoID=514339

http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?cat=&photoID=518018

http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?cat=&photoID=516894

http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?cat=&photoID=515464

http://www.betterphoto.com/gallery/dynoGallDetail.asp?cat=&photoID=520799


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9/5/2004 10:10:15 AM

 
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