BetterPhoto Q&A
Category: New Questions

Photography Question 
Stacey Jensen
 

Pictures in a church


How do I aviod the redish yellow tone to a photograph taken in a church? Example: For a wedding


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7/27/2004 10:44:14 AM

 
Michelle Ross
BetterPhoto Member Since: 1/1/2004
  Make sure your white balance corresponds with the type of lighting you are using! This will help alot! It isn't always the Fix All but it should help!


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9/1/2005 4:47:07 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   Just in case you are using daylight balanced film rather than digital, use an 80A filter. It will correct for the tungsten lighting.


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9/1/2005 6:20:57 AM

 
Brenda  D. 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/27/2005
  Kerry, you've always been very helpful, not to sound dumb or anything but I dont know one lighting from another, is there a place to tell me what kind of lighting is what? when I used my 80a filter I got a bluish cast so apperntly I used it for the wrong lighting.


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9/1/2005 7:51:43 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   If you really want to be exact, you could buy a color temperature meter. Of course, that would be extremely expensive so I don't recommend that. The easy way is this: Incandescent lights (the kind in your house) are tungsten lights. They give a sort of golden look to your pictures, which can be attractive if that is the look you want. For these, an 80A filter will correct the color for daylight film. Flourescent lights (which usually give a green look to your pictures) need an FLD filter.


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9/1/2005 8:05:38 AM

 
Brenda  D. 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/27/2005
  OH geesh I'm smacking my self in the forhead giving myself a DUH! now I understand, thanks :) I thought the golded cast was from the gold oak coloring from my walls! hated the look. one more question please, is daylight film determined by the speed?


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9/1/2005 8:19:03 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   No, daylight film is color balanced to the light from the sun. The speed is just its sensitivity to light. Tungsten film is balanced to tungsten lighting (incandescent) and is available in a more limited range of speeds. (Isn't the human eye wonderful? It is balanced to all kinds of lighting!)

The golden look of tungsten light can be nice, especially when combined with daylight. The picture "Girl at Catholic Church" in my gallery is such an example. I had a combination of incandescent light (which added a touch of gold) and daylight shining through the stained glass windows, which kept it from turning too gold. I also shot this one with flash to eliminate the golden color and didn't like it nearly as much.


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9/1/2005 8:33:54 AM

 
Brenda  D. 
BetterPhoto Member Since: 3/27/2005
  im going to do practice shots combining tungsten light and natural light. I have a small "studio" set up in my den iit has a large window off to the right which allows good lighting but not too harsh, something about your photo of the "Girl at Catholic Church" keeps drawing be back I'm so fasinated with it but cant pinpoint why, I think a lot of it is it seems to have a lot of calm serenity to it.


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9/1/2005 8:52:17 AM

 
Kerry L. Walker   Thank you so much for that comment. I don't claim that that picture is any kind of great shot but that is exactly the mood I was trying to capture. It is nice to know someone else sees it the same way.


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9/1/2005 9:10:09 AM

 
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