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Photography Question 
Sharon Morris
 

panorama's


OK, this is a basic question, but in my two experiments with attempting to photostitch, I'm still eding up with slanted areas of the image that are of different densities. Of course I'm using the same exposures and in one attempt, I used the same focus aswell, in the other, I adjusted my focus as I panned.

Could anyone give me some advice, please. I know that I must be making a simple mistake, but can't figure out what it is. -Thanks, Shari


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7/21/2004 6:40:31 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  hold the camera by hand or did you use a tripod. And a regular perspective lens like a 50mm might help.
You can get a tripod with a bubble level, or you can buy a bubble level at a hardware store and just place it on top of the tripod's camera mount plate, if you want to be as level as possible.
But use a tripod, get it level, an just rotate the camera around. Take pictures to leave some overlap, instead of trying to have the edge of each picture be the edge of each section.
Like shooting a yard stick. Instead of the 1st picture's edge go exactly to the 4in. mark and the 2nd start at the 4in. mark, make the 1st go a little over the 4in. mark and the 2nd begin a little behind the 4in. mark. Blend in the transition.


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7/21/2004 10:34:43 AM

 
Sharon Morris   Ok, that's what I've been doing, but I believe that the problem is the blending of the stitched image. Does it matter whether or not I use a fixed focal plane?

Thanks for your help, you're always helpful. -Shari


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7/21/2004 10:44:37 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  Fixed focal plane or fixed focal length? Fixed focal plane is keeping the camera at the same spot relative to what you're shooting, isn't it? As in parallel in one shot and not tilting it up or down in another. Is that what you meant?
Using the same focal length makes things easier to line up. The natural curvature of wide angle on the edges makes it hard to line up images in a panoramic, but using different focal lengths really accentuates that.
Well anyway, in a nutshell for best results I would say to use the same focal length, and keep the focal plane(level) the same.
Is your main problem having a dark line going down the picture where one image connects to the other?


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7/21/2004 11:23:20 AM

 
Sharon Morris   Yes, I meant to say length. And yes, there's a dark slanted line where the images join.


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7/21/2004 11:29:20 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  It does matter to use the same focal lenght with each picture you stitch. With my version of photostich, there's even a step that ask what focal length you used for the pictures. And it ask for only one. You don't answer for each picture you're stiching.
Have you ever used photoshop and used layers. that's what I've used anytime I've connected two images together.


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7/21/2004 11:51:09 AM

 
Sharon Morris   I've been trying it with PS E 2, but haven't come across anything that asks for a focal length. Shoul I try anything other than the photomerge option?


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7/21/2004 11:56:48 AM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  try the basic adding layers together on a long canvas, feather the edges so you'll get them to blend, then flatten all the layers together. I'll try a quick one later to show you.


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7/21/2004 12:04:52 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
  First step you can just extend the canvas size with your first picture. Then with the 2nd picture to go next to it, you can cut/copy and paste and line it up with overlapping edges till it looks good.
On this part I had to adjust with curves my start off picture because of clouds and sun, it was lighter than the 2nd picture. And if needed, you can use the erase tool(which I did for connecting the 2nd picture to the 1st) and erase on edge with a feathered brush to take away any visible seams.
Then you continue on with any other pictures you want to add. I didn't need to erase any edges with the last picture layer, it didn't look necessary.
Next to last step, all 4 layers are merged but you can see at the top that there's still an empty space that gets left after the layers are lined up and merged. Even with a 50mm you still misalignment trying to merge several images.
So just a slight crop and you have your panoramic.


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7/21/2004 3:49:24 PM

 
Gregory LaGrange
BetterPhoto Member Since: 11/11/2003
gregorylagrange.org
 
 
 
First step you can just extend the canvas size with your first picture. Then with the 2nd picture to go next to it, you can cut/copy and paste and line it up with overlapping edges till it looks good.
On this part I had to adjust with curves my start off picture because of clouds and sun, it was lighter than the 2nd picture. And if needed, you can use the erase tool(which I did for connecting the 2nd picture to the 1st) and erase on edge with a feathered brush to take away any visible seams.
Then you continue on with any other pictures you want to add. I didn't need to erase any edges with the last picture layer, it didn't look necessary.
Next to last step, all 4 layers are merged but you can see at the top that there's still an empty space that gets left after the layers are lined up and merged. Even with a 50mm you still misalignment trying to merge several images.
So just a slight crop and you have your panoramic.


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7/21/2004 3:49:33 PM

 
Sharon Morris   Thank you. I'll give it a try tonight. You're soo helpfull, all of the time
-Shari


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7/21/2004 4:06:39 PM

 
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