Wide-Angle for a Creatively Distorted Perspective

by Jim Zuckerman

Roman ruins at Merida, Spain
Roman ruins at Merida, Spain
© Jim Zuckerman
All Rights Reserved
The closer you get to the foreground with a wide-angle lens, the more distorted it will appear. This isn't bad. Dominant foreground elements that loom large in the frame compared to the background add visual impact to any composition. I use this technique all the time.

In "Roman ruins", I shot with my 14mm Canon lens, and the immediate foreground marble ledge was only 24 inches from the lens. This exaggeration of perspective is not even close to what I saw with my eyes, but it makes a very strong and dynamic image. I encourage you to try this type of photographic treatment with all kinds of subjects, from fashion to landscapes, and from architecture to exotic cars, such as "1932 Bucciali" below.

1932 Bucciali
1932 Bucciali
© Jim Zuckerman
All Rights Reserved

Notes from the editor...







Article by Jim Zuckerman. To learn more about photography, explore the many online photography and Photoshop classes offered here at BetterPhoto.com.